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What's in your cup?
snwcmpr
I tried the Esmeralda Gesha in my HT and wasn't impressed. I mean I like a great Ethiopian much better. But, I don't know what profile for Gesha would be best.

Ken in NC
--------------
Backwoods Roaster
"I wish I could taste as well as I wish I could roast."

As Abraham Lincoln said "Do not trust everything you read on the internet".
 
JETROASTER
Ethiopian Yirgacheffe. FTO. It's good....not awesome. It could be a WP Sidamo for the way it looks, tastes, etc
No blueberry in this Yirge, but I'm drinking it anyway!
-Scott
JETROASTER attached the following image:
sack_o_yirge.jpg
 
JackH
I roasted 600g of Guatemala Huehuetenango yesterday. Drank a cup today and it is very nice with the brightness I like. I ended the roast a bit sooner than I usually do. 12 1/2 min duration. Dump @ 415F
---Jack

KKTO Roaster.
 
Bonsai Doug
Drinking Burundi Kirimiro Teka this morning -- roasted to about FC a few days ago -- crisp, clean cup with sort of an almond-ish aftertaste.
 
ginny
Doug, my man:

I am enjoying the very same as a cafe crema, wonderful cup love my Africans.

ginny

ThumbsUp
 
boar_d_laze
Pre-roast blend of equal parts El Salvador San Francisco Natural, Guatemala Antigua Covadonga and Panama Carmen Estate. Roasted to FC/FC+, slow and gentle all the way through with a slight drag for drying and another one for the interval after 1st crack. It's a blend we use a lot for espresso -- and it's also very good for Vac and FP.

A better variation on the same theme -- if you like chocolate -- is equal parts Costa Rica Helsar Zarcero, El Salvador La Minita Honey (same finca as the SFN); and Guatemala Antigua Covadnga, roasted in exactly the same way. Oustanding.

Been doing some of the Guatemala Gesha as an SO, as well.

snwcmpr wrote:
I tried the Esmeralda Gesha in my HT and wasn't impressed. I mean I like a great Ethiopian much better. But, I don't know what profile for Gesha would be best.


Moderate charge temp; slow through drying, make sure you get a strong bread aroma before bumping the heat; moderately fast up to 1st C; then slow it down again until C/C+ for brewing and C+/FC for espresso. If you like the sort of medium roasts which were standard until the third wave rolled in, you'll want the Gesha just a skosh lighter.

End of 1st C can be a little hard to hear. You probably want to go around two minutes after. Don't drag it too much or you'll lose vibrancy; and don't worry, there will be plenty of sweetness.

Keep your eye on the trier (if you have one) to know when to drop; if you don't have a trier keep your eye on the window -- you don't want to go too dark or you'll kill the fruit.

A little skin between the lobes is OK, don't worry about it; it's not visually unattractive either.

Total roast time might be a little slower than you'd expect from a similar charge of equally hard beans. I don't know if that's because it's Gesha or because the moisture content might be bumping against 12%. Be patient, don't push.

If you see any wrinkles on the bean surface or there's any tipping -- you're drying too hot.

Florals, big sugars, big cherries, not much chocolate, not much nuts.

Brew espresso a little on the hot side. 2-1/2 to 3min infusion time in a FP, 4 is too much. You want to try a siphon if you can. Haven't tried it drip.

BDL
 
snwcmpr
Thanks,
I bought 1 lb of Esmeralda at 28 p/lb.
I used a half in the HT. Now I have a fluidbed that roast 1 lb, so the HT is on a shelf. Maybe if/when the price for gesha is reasonable, I will try again.
Anyway, I printed this and will put it with roaster stuff.

Ken
--------------
Backwoods Roaster
"I wish I could taste as well as I wish I could roast."

As Abraham Lincoln said "Do not trust everything you read on the internet".
 
ginny
What Tom is saying is not for the faint of heart:

Aged Sumatra Aech Pwani - Vintage 2007


It is in my Hot Top as I type. Tom says is is intense, peppery hot, charred notes, syrupy sweetness, herb, mint, aromatic wood and black cherry...

one hell of a combination.

smells divine.

ginny


party
 
Hieronymus Mouse
Hi everyone,

On 9/29, I roasted in my Gene Cafe 226 grams of Huehue from Victrola roasting company in Seattle. Here are the roasting params. (I cut this batch way earlier than previous to stop producing a more generic roast.)

Preheated to point where drum registers 300 on intro of beans.
Kept at 375 for five minutes, then bumped to 475.
Cracks began at the eleven (11) minute mark, dropped 30 seconds later to 460.
Cracks ended around the 14.5 minute mark.
Cut to cool down at 14.8 minute mark.

Tasting this morning (10/3):
Lightly sweet "cookie" taste with ample viscosity, not cloying. Bitter-bright fruit in finish, not agressive. More complex in aftertaste, something like a mix of dry and fresh fruits with a fresh baked bread in the back and sides of tongue.

I think this lighter roasting is better for me than the heavier ones of previous tries. Any suggestions as to how to adjust the profile for the next wave of explorations?

Michael

PS: I originally posted this in the Gene Cafe forum section but moved it here on Ginny's advice. John suggested that the charge and warm temps seemed aggressive. I also asked Amanda at Sweet Marias who said that in a GC she usually starts at 480 and keeps it there to 1C, then drops to 450 to end. How do you like your Huehue roasted, and what advice do you have for me regarding my params (above)? Are all Huehue beans hard, or are some soft? Thanks, and happy roasting. M
 
John Despres
Hi, Michael.
I warm the beans at 300.

480 will work as a start without a warming period or a preheat. Did Amanda say how she starts?

Have fun!

John
Respect the bean.
John Despres
Fresh Roast 8, Gene Cafe, JYTT 1k, Quest M3, Mazzer Mini, Technivorm, various size presses and many more brewers.
 
www.sceneitallproductions.com
Hieronymus Mouse
John, I apologize, I misrepresented Amanda's params. What she said was she starts at 480 (no mention of a warming period) and then drops the temp to **whatever temp the beans are at when they reach first crack**. My GC "let it rip at 482" with beans in experiment showed 480 when first crack started, obviously nothing to do with the bean temp. So, I couldn't follow her instructions. I'd drop the temp.

Are Huehue beans hard or soft? These beans look soft (with a wider light crease), but I thought all Guatemalan beans were high grown hard. So confused. Your suggestions (elsewhere) indicated a much gentler roasting for Huehue than you have recommended for high grown hard beans. i think.

I've got a little fear of stalling the roast, and so have been hesitant to drop the temp to 440 at the first sign of 1C. Is this fear justified?

I'll roast another batch in a week coming closer to your params and report. This one is quite tastey, though.

Thanks, as always.

Michael
 
ChicagoJohn
I just finished roasting a pound of Tanzania Mara Tarime from Sweet Maria's they received in May and I received in August and vacuum sealed and put in a deep freeze. After equilibrating to ambient conditions, roasted to 1C at around 194C (381F) at 7 min and ending at 9 min after end of 1C at 205C (400F).

To my personal taste, it is among the top 2 or 3 samples I've roasted over the past six months with what I regard as great balance and breadth of flavor.
So many beans; so little time....
 
oldgearhead
This week I'm blending two great coffees From Theta Ridge,
Guatemala Rio Ocho and the spicy Rwanda. I'm roasting the
Guat full-city and the Rwanda full-city plus, then mixing 50-50.
The blend has the expensive pipe tobacco aroma, a wine-tingle,
and a hint of mahogany. However, as it cools the wood flavor becomes stronger because it does need more rest, but I like it, a lot.
What I like about Theta Ridge:
1) $13.03 FedX ground shipping up to 40 pounds
2) Very high quality beans.
3) Low prices. Five pounds of Rwanda for $20.20
4) They are located only 90 miles away so most orders arrive next day.
No oil on my beans...
 
ChicagoJohn
For the past few days, my wife and I have been making a "pick-me-up" around 1 or 2 pm. We grind 30 gm of roasted beans with a hand burr mill, brew with the Aeropress using 12 oz water according to the factory directions, and divide equally into each of two Bodum double-wall glasses, each with a teaspoon of heavy cream and a tablespoon of Kahlua.

This recipe makes us feel good and alert at once: I highly recommend it.
So many beans; so little time....
 
LongLeafSoaps
oldgearhead wrote:

This week I'm blending two great coffees From Theta Ridge,
Guatemala Rio Ocho and the spicy Rwanda. I'm roasting the
Guat full-city and the Rwanda full-city plus, then mixing 50-50.
The blend has the expensive pipe tobacco aroma, a wine-tingle,
and a hint of mahogany. However, as it cools the wood flavor becomes stronger because it does need more rest, but I like it, a lot.
What I like about Theta Ridge:
1) $13.03 FedX ground shipping up to 40 pounds
2) Very high quality beans.
3) Low prices. Five pounds of Rwanda for $20.20
4) They are located only 90 miles away so most orders arrive next day.


Their prices are certainly tempting! O.O
Carpe Diem With Coffee
 
SteveG
What's in my cup??! ...i wish I knew!.

I really need to clean up my act! Buried in the back of my roasts' stash ...this morning I found a cup's worth of unlabeled nasty-looking "oily" Full City+! I'm thinking they're at least 10-14-days old ...so I almost tossed them! (WAIT!)

Instead, since I was a cup slurping fool (having had (4) 2-oz brews of different beans already) ...I went ahead and brewed up yet another cup of this "unknown" bean ...after a few sips I of the mystery brew ...."aaaAh! I seem to remember this one!"

Holy Tastebuds, It's that Ethiopian I roasted over 9-days ago! so long ago I'm not sure when! NICE! ...It's flavor had gotten a lot more interesting and complex, fuller texture, nuttier with a very smooth after taste.

I immediately gave it 'best cup of morning' status ...so I tossed another log in the wood stove and read another chapter in my book before going out to toss hay to the critters. (18f)

Cheers, SteveG

Lesson learned: Don't toss old bean unless you know for sure they're bad old!
SteveG attached the following image:
dsc08002.jpeg

...Underdeveloped Roasted Being!
 
allenb
El Salvador El Guarumal Honey from Happy Mug. Roasted in my 1 lb drum roaster to just beyond cinnamon color in 12 min (very light roast). Development time after onset of 1c was 2:30.

Brewed the first pot of the first roast this morning after a 3 day rest in the Bonvita BV1800. This is a spectacular coffee and I knew there was something special about it when the aroma from the post-brew grounds in the basket smelled like a combination of chocolate/black cherry liqueur and Kahlua liqueur. The flavor in the cup mirrored these aromas.

If anyone gives this coffee a go, make sure you go for a light roast as I'm hearing these qualities go up in smoke when taking it any further.

HM description:
This El Salvador is a honey processed (puled natural) microlot on the El Guarumal estate which is up in the mountains on the border of Guatemala. The beans are meticulously sorted first, and then they are placed on drying beds and stirred every two hours for a few days so they dry evenly and without fermentation (ths is the honey-process part, which is always labor intensive and generally a small batch microlot) Then the fruit is removed and they are washed and dried and packed in Grain-Pro bags to preserve its freshness.
I was surprised with the quality of the beans, and I enjoyed the taste of them. As expected, it has a nice honey sweetness to it and no fermented or earthy tastes. And as expected, the undertones are slightly fruity and fairly subtle beneath the sweet coffee taste, and it has a soft creamy mouthfeel. The undertones present could be described as black cherry and graham crackers.
By definition, a honey coffee has had the sugars of the coffee fruit imbued into the pit during the processing, so it is a delicate bean that is susceptible to scorching. Home roasting won't have a problem, but if you have a large drum roaster, don't preheat it above 350 degrees or you will scorch the beans as soon as they hit the drum. Nudge the heat up gently, evenly, get it through the 1st cracks, maybe wait 20 seconds, let it out. If in doubt, err on the side of being too light. As you go darker, it loses its undertones. As you get into the 2nd cracks the sugars burn and it loses its appeal altogether. For drum roasters, try to keep the roast between 12 and 15 minutes.


Allen
1/2 lb and 1 lb drum, Siemens Sirocco fluidbed, presspot, chemex, cajun biggin brewer from the backwoods of Louisiana
 
oldgearhead
Well it's February so what else but PNG!
I have some from both Happy Mug and Theta Ridge and I think I'll try some from Burman's next week. Why? Because it's all a bit different and it's all good.

The Theta Ridge PNG is a little smoother with a slight Baker's chocolate flavor as it cools.All the people I've shared it with love it. The Happy Mug PNG, on the other hand is 'In you face, curl your toes fruit' and as it cools it turns to unsweetened lemonade.
Wow! Both are great! I can't wait for the next batch. Humm, I think GBBC has some from the same mill as the Happy Mug version. I wonder if it's different?

I'm a 'slurper' not a 'cupper' and I'm sure your taste is different than mine...
No oil on my beans...
 
Tony_C
Last cup is Las Lomas - Huehuetenango, Guatemala. Very bright and fruity. I did two separate roasts of 1/2 pounds, and my longer darker roast gave up high fruit after degassing for a few days. Very bright, very fruity, and oh so enjoyable.
Behmor 1600+, SC/TO, KKTO (Building), Baratza Encore, Chemex, Bodum Chambord French Press, Turkish Cezve
 
allenb
Tony, thanks for posting about the Las Lomas Guat. I've been hoping for a good Guat to surface after so many so-so offerings I've cupped in the last couple of years. I'll have to give it a whirl.

Allen
1/2 lb and 1 lb drum, Siemens Sirocco fluidbed, presspot, chemex, cajun biggin brewer from the backwoods of Louisiana
 
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