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koriglman
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Male Guide Reviews Some of the common supplements used to assist you lose weight are: Hoodia can be an herbal supplement that is very popular in programs designed to help you lose excess fat. It is em

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Quien me pude ayudar por favor, con el diseƱo para construir un tostador que funcione ya sea con Gas, electricidad o flujo de aire caliente, de unos (18 o 25) Kg. estoy en Venezuela

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Help picking out shop roaster?
LeslieC
I am looking at purchasing a shop roaster. I am looking at a Caffe Rosto Digirosto PRO Power, and a Ambex YM2. We saw the Caffe Rosto Digirosto PRO Power demonstrated and simple and easy to use. I have also read good things about the Ambex YM2 as well. Can anyone tell me if there is a difference between the outcome of the coffee? I know one uses a halogen lamp and the other gas.

Thank you.

Les
 
seedlings
Well, Les, I'm not qualified to answer. Brainiac uses halogen for heat on his roaster and he likes it fine. I'm not sure one could tell side by side, with the same roast profile, any difference between the two processes.

Experts..? It's your turn...

CHAD
Roaster: CoffeeAir II 2# DIY air roaster
Grinder: Vintage Grindmaster 500
Brewers: Vintage Cory DCU DCL, Aeropress, Press, Osaka Titanium pourover
 
EddieDove
Scott Miller of Ogeechee River Coffee Company (Stateboro, Georgia) owns an Ambex YM-10. He is a great guy and you may wish to contact him about the Ambex.
Respectfully,

Eddie Dove

The South Coast Coffee Roaster
vita non est vivere sed valere vita est
Home Coffee Roasting Blog and Reference
http://southcoast...gspot.com/
 
http://southcoastcoffeeroaster.blogspot.com
Kaffee Bitte
I read some reviews on the Digirosto Pro line by pro roasters who tested them out. While they are fairly easy to use, they have difficulty getting the coffee up to first crack before at least 15 minutes. One of them said it was more often heading to twenty minutes for first. That is baked range if you ask me. Apparently they also have difficulty getting the coffee through second. I will have to dig a bit in my favorites, but I know I have the link about it some where. I'll post it for you when I can find it.

Ambex has good customer service and repair service that goes along with their roasters. They also have programs that can log almost everything you would ever need to know about the roast. These basically download from the roasters controller into a laptop, etc. The Ambex roasters will however be very manual in control. You will be there altering settings throughout the roasts. But you'd be doing that on most any roaster anyway. One good thing about the large drum roaster manufacturers is that they send a tech out to train you on all the controls of that roaster. That can give you a BIG boost on the learning curve. Ambex is one of these. Also Probat and Diedrick. I am not sure about the San Franciscan, but they also may do this.
Lynn

"Some days it's spice, other days it's bitter dirt."
 
Favorite? How can there be such a thing?
cup_in_hand
I have never had the chance to try a rosto so I can't say to much about it. However, I do know they are not taken very seriously by roasting professionals. Also there is a huge difference in gas, electric, and radiant heating, with gas being by far the most responsive to to the user.

As far as Ambex roasters go I have had a chance to try them out on a limited basis at events and such and they are definitely nice machines. They have a good reputation for service which is almost as important as the machine itself. Especially if you are starting new in business and plunking down a big chunk of change for your roaster and it needs to be running if you are to stay in business.
Anton
A life without coffee is a life not worth living.
 
Kaffee Bitte
Another option if you are thinking air roaster is this...

http://www.sonofr...m/roaster/

One thing with this roaster is it has to have the same load every time. Of course most of the professional drums will be pretty much the same. It's easier to profile that way.
Lynn

"Some days it's spice, other days it's bitter dirt."
 
Favorite? How can there be such a thing?
bvwelch
I have no idea what a "shop roaster" is, but I have enjoyed many cups of coffee that were roasted on this Burns roaster. Click on their photo for details.

http://www.kaffee...

The more I experiment with home roasting, the more respect and admiration I have for the great folks at the 'Klatsch'. It is a nice family-owned and operated business, still going strong after 30 years. But it is 100 mile round-trip drive for me.

bill
Edited by bvwelch on 02/13/2008 3:55 PM
 
Kaffee Bitte
That was a nice website you linked Bill. It's good to see family businesses that just keep on moving right along.

I'll put this in the Glossary thread too, but a shop roaster is a smaller sized bulk roaster. Anywhere from 1 lb to really even a 25 lb roaster. They are called shop roasters because they are meant to be used to supply the coffee for a coffee shop (or several), but not for widely spread chains or for sale in bulk to grocers, etc.
Lynn

"Some days it's spice, other days it's bitter dirt."
 
Favorite? How can there be such a thing?
Tyler
i'll admit, i've never used either, but the digirosto looks like a glorified home roaster. i assume you want a shop roaster because you're opening a shop, or want to start doing your own roasting for your existing shop. with that in mind, i wouldn't advocate the ym2 either. if i were you, i'd buy a gas drum roaster with a bigger capacity.

think about it: you can do about three roasts an hour (around 15 min to roast, 5 min to cool down to starting point). A two pound roaster means six pounds an hour; a fifteen pound roaster means forty-five an hour! though you may not think you'll be using that much coffee, a great source of revenue when you roast your own beans is selling to separate accounts. it's a big investment, i know, but it will pay off.

also (there's been experiments done on this), roasting larger batches seems to yield better results. if you take my advice and want to go all out with a larger shop roaster, i'd recommend diedrich or probat. if you still want a smaller roaster, diedrich makes a nice table top roaster. hope this helps.

-tsk
 
Kaffee Bitte
Tyler does have a point LeslieC. But could you give us some more information about what your usage plans are? This might help to aim you towards the right fit for your needs.
Lynn

"Some days it's spice, other days it's bitter dirt."
 
Favorite? How can there be such a thing?
sdcoffeeroaster
Tyler wrote:
, i wouldn't advocate the ym2 either. if i were you, i'd buy a gas drum roaster with a bigger capacity.

think about it: you can do about three roasts an hour (around 15 min to roast, 5 min to cool down to starting point). A two pound roaster means six pounds an hour; a fifteen pound roaster means forty-five an hour! though you may not think you'll be using that much coffee, a great source of revenue when you roast your own beans is selling to separate accounts. it's a big investment, i know, but it will pay off.

-tsk


The YM2 refers to kg, which would be about 4.4 lbs green. Ambex calls it a 5 lb roaster, which would yield something like 4 lbs of roasted coffee. If you assume 3 roasts per hr then it's 15 lbs an hr. If you were very coordinated and organized you might squeeze 20 lbs an hr but I think 15 might be more realistic. The one advantage of the smaller size roaster, YM2 or Diedrich IR3 is that you might get away without having to buy an afterburner. They're expensive to buy and run.
Fred
Fresh Roast+, I-roast, and 2 BBQ roasters, one with IR back burner (Blue Ember grill from Fiesta)
Espobar Brewtus II
 
Kaffee Bitte
Another advantage to the 5 pounders is being able to do smaller roasts of a wide variety of beans. The larger roasters require large loads. In fact it is best to keep to the same load weight every time. Go under and the roast will progress to fast. Go over that weight and you could very well end up with baked beans.

Were I able to afford it (and have the space for it) a roaster of this size would be what I would get. Maybe some day.
Lynn

"Some days it's spice, other days it's bitter dirt."
 
Favorite? How can there be such a thing?
cup_in_hand
I answered about the Rosto and the Ambex because you asked specifically about those two, but while we're on the subject I'll make a list. I haven't used many of these company's machines so they come without recommendations. (This may make choosing harder rather than easier, but interesting none the less.)
New Machines:
Ambex
Diedrich
Probat
San Franciscan
Renegade
Deleware City (Topher)
US roaster Corp.
Samiac

Used/Antique Machines
Victor Allen
Coffee Tech
Roasters Exchange
Praxis

Happy Hunting!
Edited by cup_in_hand on 02/15/2008 6:16 PM
Anton
A life without coffee is a life not worth living.
 
Tyler
actually, that's not completely true about the large roasters. although i wouldn't recommend roasting less than one pound on a 25 pound roaster, two pounds will turn out just fine. you have to understand that the difference between a homemade home roasters and a pro roaster is that the parameters on a commercial machine can be controlled much more precisely.

also, don't buy a renegade. they are amazing, but they will tell you themselves, they do not make 'first roaster' roasters.
 
Tyler
oh, about the afterburner: i wasn't required to put one in for my shop, but the laws may differ in your town. for me, an exhaust hood was mandated. the hood itself cost about as much as the roaster, so yeah, be weary of the other cost you may incur with a larger machine.
 
sdcoffeeroaster
Tyler wrote:
actually, that's not completely true about the large roasters. although i wouldn't recommend roasting less than one pound on a 25 pound roaster, two pounds will turn out just fine. you have to understand that the difference between a homemade home roasters and a pro roaster is that the parameters on a commercial machine can be controlled much more precisely.

also, don't buy a renegade. they are amazing, but they will tell you themselves, they do not make 'first roaster' roasters.


I've heard the same thing about the larger roasters that you can't roast smaller loads well. I have noticed on my BBQ drum that the smaller loads take more attention. Since I've added a bean mass probe my control has improved but I really don't have the air flow of a commercial drum and the burners are not finely adjusted easily.

I've also heard that the Diedrich with its IR burners is easier to control with smaller loads but the flip side to that is that the times go up too much when you try something close to the rated load. You can't have it all I guess. I've also noticed that the mid size roasters use about the same amount of gas per load as the smallest ones so I might pay to not go too small right? Maybe an IR 7 instead of an IR3 for instance?
Fred
Fresh Roast+, I-roast, and 2 BBQ roasters, one with IR back burner (Blue Ember grill from Fiesta)
Espobar Brewtus II
 
Kaffee Bitte
What I had heard about doing smaller loads on the big drums was that the profiling would change considerably, making it much more difficult to control the timing of the cracks. Were I to ever convince myself to buy a professional roaster I would probably go for a natural gas fired roaster over electric.

I would love to hear some more information about approaching profiling by the pro's.
Lynn

"Some days it's spice, other days it's bitter dirt."
 
Favorite? How can there be such a thing?
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