topbanner.gif
Login
Username

Password




Not a member yet?
Click here to register.

Forgotten your password?
Request a new one here.
Shoutbox
You must login to post a message.

Koffee Kosmo
OfflineAdmin
· 08/28/2020 7:15 PM
I have updated my signature and added links to the KKTO roaster build

snwcmpr
Offline
· 08/16/2020 8:12 AM
I will say, it only happened once, briefly, to me.

NetriX
OfflineAdmin
· 08/16/2020 7:57 AM
I was blocked too, our hosting provider is dropping the ball lately. thumbdown

Koffee Kosmo
OfflineAdmin
· 08/12/2020 5:37 PM
And I thought it was just me that couldn't access the site All good now - coffee kept me company

JackH
OfflineAdmin
· 08/10/2020 8:46 PM
Had to make myself another cup of coffee to get through it.

Users Online
Guests Online: 3

Members Online: 0

Total Members: 6,746
Newest Member: jordo_99
In Memory Of Ginny
Donations

Latest Donations
Anonymous - 5.00
Anonymous - 5.00
renatoa - 2.00
JitterzZ - 2.01
renatoa - 2.00

View Thread

Who is here? 1 guest(s)
 Print Thread
Cyclops - my 1kg drum build
directtraderoasting
My 10" diameter x 12" drum is around 3mm thick (a little over) and it's pretty responsive, but you still have to be ahead of what the bean is going to do when profiling.

You have to do a few roasts to know how the bean responds then tweak your adjustments based on that bean and how is going to act in certain stages of the roast.

I run 2 temp probes. One in the bean mass and one near the opposite side up by the bean loading chute (hot air in the drum).

I also have an analog thermometer in my bean loading chute and chaff collector (mainly to keep an eye on things/backup).

Edit: if I ever build another 2kg/2.5kg, I may go a little thicker on the drum wall. The next standard option I can easily order is a .250" wall pipe, which is 6mm. I think that may be better overall. I do like that the 3mm drum is quick to heat up and cool down though and it's responsive.

I think the slightly thicker wall might be easier though, just make the adjustments earlier
Edited by directtraderoasting on 07/13/2020 8:24 PM
 
pjvdl

Quote

directtraderoasting wrote:

My 10" diameter x 12" drum is around 3mm thick (a little over) and it's pretty responsive, but you still have to be ahead of what the bean is going to do when profiling.

You have to do a few roasts to know how the bean responds then tweak your adjustments based on that bean and how is going to act in certain stages of the roast.

I run 2 temp probes. One in the bean mass and one near the opposite side up by the bean loading chute (hot air in the drum).

I also have an analog thermometer in my bean loading chute and chaff collector (mainly to keep an eye on things/backup).

Edit: if I ever build another 2kg/2.5kg, I may go a little thicker on the drum wall. The next standard option I can easily order is a .250" wall pipe, which is 6mm. I think that may be better overall. I do like that the 3mm drum is quick to heat up and cool down though and it's responsive.

I think the slightly thicker wall might be easier though, just make the adjustments earlier


Interesting figures. I am a little concerned that a 1.6mm drum will not have enough heat inertia. When I get my new elements, I'm keen to test the responsiveness of mine.
-- Paul

ECM Rocket espresso
Eureka Mignon grinder
500g BBQ rotisserie roaster
1kg drum roaster (under construction)
 
danst

Quote

renatoa wrote:

For the drum approach I would not rely on responsiveness to control something related to profile... I mean based on real time feedback from machine temperatures.
All the pros I know roasting on drum machines are using recipes based massively on machine natural curve and their high inertia, with only 3-4 power change points and nothing else....


Yes, but If I keep preheating reasonably low, say 200-210 C, then I can be in FC in 8 or 13 minutes, it depends also on ambient temperature and power of the roaster. This is profiling too, how quickly to go to FC. With more power I have more choices. And a chance of correction of false preheating. 2.5 kW for 1 kg is rather low. Apart of SSFF or FSSF profiles for the same machine.
1000g Ugly roaster, QM Alexia EVO, Bezzera BZ09, Niche Zero, Fiorenzato Doge 63, Mazzer Jolly(Mestre), Handground, T. Moccamaster, Aeropress.
 
danst

Quote

pjvdl wrote:


I am interested in your suggestion of heating rods. What do you mean by these?


I forgot supply problems. We have 3 phases 3x25A, 230V . Plenty of power .
The heating rods is standard safe heating in roasters. Like in North 1kg electric, Hottop, Quest M3...
North: https://northroasters.com/wp-content/...67e_15.png
I have custom made heating.
1000g Ugly roaster, QM Alexia EVO, Bezzera BZ09, Niche Zero, Fiorenzato Doge 63, Mazzer Jolly(Mestre), Handground, T. Moccamaster, Aeropress.
 
allenb
pjvdl posted in another thread:

Quote

Thanks for the clarification. Yes, I understand. I don't want to hijack Cyrus's thread, so might be better to respond in the other thread I started, but I had hoped to use nichrome to provide a blend of convective and radiant on the drum. Unfortunately my testing with nichrome is showing this is probably not practical with the forced air requirements of the nichrome. Might need to look at tubular elements or gas heating if I wnat more radiant on the drum. I am also considering infrared halogen elements to heat the drum (not directly on the beans).

Do you have a tubular element that you would recommend? I am also wondering how best to control a tubular element using a TC4/Adruino combination. . Do you know if slow PWM still works, or do I need to look at ICC or phase angle control?


Nichrome can be used but if one wants to use nichrome resistive wire and to have it provide radiant and convection, you'll need to wind your own element using a much larger gauge that can handle operating in free air or with very limited air movement without exceeding the watt density for free air. Probat did this with their electric heated sample roaster quite a few years ago and worked well.

Glass sheathed infrared halogen has it's own peculiar challenges in that they can be difficult to mount under the drum although it's possible.

Controlling a tubular element with their high thermal inertia is fortunately easy to control and only needs simple on-off duty cycling by your controller of choice and yes, slow pwm is fine.

I'll look up the company that made me a few sets of tubulars and post the contact info.
1/2 lb and 1 lb drum, Siemens Sirocco fluidbed, presspot, chemex, cajun biggin brewer from the backwoods of Louisiana
 
directtraderoasting

Quote

pjvdl wrote:

Quote

directtraderoasting wrote:

My 10" diameter x 12" drum is around 3mm thick (a little over) and it's pretty responsive, but you still have to be ahead of what the bean is going to do when profiling.

You have to do a few roasts to know how the bean responds then tweak your adjustments based on that bean and how is going to act in certain stages of the roast.

I run 2 temp probes. One in the bean mass and one near the opposite side up by the bean loading chute (hot air in the drum).

I also have an analog thermometer in my bean loading chute and chaff collector (mainly to keep an eye on things/backup).

Edit: if I ever build another 2kg/2.5kg, I may go a little thicker on the drum wall. The next standard option I can easily order is a .250" wall pipe, which is 6mm. I think that may be better overall. I do like that the 3mm drum is quick to heat up and cool down though and it's responsive.

I think the slightly thicker wall might be easier though, just make the adjustments earlier


Interesting figures. I am a little concerned that a 1.6mm drum will not have enough heat inertia. When I get my new elements, I'm keen to test the responsiveness of mine.


If it really doesn't have enough, you could maybe go the double walled route adding another later of steel around e drum with a 1,/4" gap. That could be done without completely redoing the drum.

Not sure how well the double walled route in eureka with electric though?

Either way it should hold enough I would think.
 
danst

Quote

allenb wrote:


Nichrome can be used but ....

Controlling a tubular element with their high thermal inertia is fortunately easy to control and only needs simple on-off duty cycling by your controller of choice and yes, slow pwm is fine...


This is what I mean, nichrome is not easy (mechanic, electric safeness) and It must be done for more power with almost no airflow. I had one 300W preheating nichrome wire element in Ugly I , 100% overlarge and it keeped. (why? - 2.4 kW heating for 700g beans and 1.6mm drum was not optimal - rather low)

Excuse my English - now I know , "heating rods" are tubular elements.
This is good way, considerably more expensive. The best is large element(s) with low power on sq.inch.
8 W/sq.inch is a good value, 13 W/sq.inch is the maximum, with shorter lifetime. (the airflow in drum roaster = no airflow in term of cooling elements and calculation of max. load)
Now I have 3mm drum, insulated body, tubular elements 3.8 kW ans switchable passive preheating of incoming air. It is definitly not overpowered. Although in summer I can make longer roasts with 1200g beans.
Ugly II is my third drum roaster, all features sit overall well, but when the elements are gone I take new with 4.5kW.
In your case - with low mains I´l consider gas heating.
Edited by danst on 07/15/2020 4:31 AM
1000g Ugly roaster, QM Alexia EVO, Bezzera BZ09, Niche Zero, Fiorenzato Doge 63, Mazzer Jolly(Mestre), Handground, T. Moccamaster, Aeropress.
 
renatoa
For low airflow I would consider a cluster of IR ceramic radiant elements, like this:

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Infrared-C...3134263085

or, why not... induction, like bullet R1 roaster... maybe sounds a bit fiction, but not so difficult as it seems.
All you have to do is to get a kitchen 2000W plate, keep the electronics for power control, extract the coil, bend it on the drum curvature, and find a way to mount, using some spacers.

Here is a page where you can see the Bullet coil assembly maintenance:
https://docs.google.com/document/d/1k...EIfdcY/pub

... and here is a kitchen induction plate coil:
https://5.imimg.com/data5/GI/UX/MY-22...00x500.jpg

Extracting from that plastic support and mould it with hot air on the drum curvature is the most difficult part of the conversion job.
 
allenb

Quote

I'll look up the company that made me a few sets of tubulars and post the contact info.


I would go with shape FT2, 4 or 6 (second link) to get length up where you need it to get watts per square inch as low as possible. I think I went up to 15 watts/sq in in free air with a ".430 diameter and didn't have a problem but I would run this by them when ordering. They can attach a rectangular mounting plate with screw holes near the termination end for mounting and you can use threaded termination ends or 1/4" spade connectors.

To obtain 4 KW you'll most likely need 4 elements to keep watt density low enough and they can be stacked on top of each other with a certain minimum space required between them.

You'll want to ensure the area where these will be mounted have a couple of layers of sheet metal baffles separating them from the outside shell and bottom of the roaster to minimize losses to the outside. Be sure to allow intake air to pass across the elements up and across the bottom of the drum on the way to the rear of the drum where the drum air entry point is to maximize heat transfer.

Tempco:

https://www.tempco.com/Tempco/Contact...act-Us.htm

https://www.tempco.com/Tempco/Resourc...ormtns.pdf
1/2 lb and 1 lb drum, Siemens Sirocco fluidbed, presspot, chemex, cajun biggin brewer from the backwoods of Louisiana
 
allenb

Quote

This is what I mean, nichrome is not easy (mechanic, electric safeness) and It must be done for more power with almost no airflow.


Quote

Excuse my English - now I know , "heating rods" are tubular elements.
This is good way, considerably more expensive. The best is large element(s) with low power on sq.inch.
8 W/sq.inch is a good value, 13 W/sq.inch is the maximum,


You're right, nichrome can be a challenge unless one is good at fabricating mica board frames and can do the crimping for terminations. Also one has to be well versed in designing for a specific watt density etc...

You're also right on more expensive. I asked one company for a ballpark $ for one hairpin 1000 watt tubular and it was around $70.00. If you need 4 to get the total KW you want, you're looking at almost $300.00 for the elements plus shipping. Gas looks better all the time but not sure how much cheaper it would be once you get the regulators, needle valves or proportional valves etc. and might be even more unless you're a good scavenger.
1/2 lb and 1 lb drum, Siemens Sirocco fluidbed, presspot, chemex, cajun biggin brewer from the backwoods of Louisiana
 
pjvdl

Quote

allenb wrote:

Quote

This is what I mean, nichrome is not easy (mechanic, electric safeness) and It must be done for more power with almost no airflow.


Quote

Excuse my English - now I know , "heating rods" are tubular elements.
This is good way, considerably more expensive. The best is large element(s) with low power on sq.inch.
8 W/sq.inch is a good value, 13 W/sq.inch is the maximum,


You're right, nichrome can be a challenge unless one is good at fabricating mica board frames and can do the crimping for terminations. Also one has to be well versed in designing for a specific watt density etc...

You're also right on more expensive. I asked one company for a ballpark $ for one hairpin 1000 watt tubular and it was around $70.00. If you need 4 to get the total KW you want, you're looking at almost $300.00 for the elements plus shipping. Gas looks better all the time but not sure how much cheaper it would be once you get the regulators, needle valves or proportional valves etc. and might be even more unless you're a good scavenger.


Wow, this is all getting much more complex than I anticiapted when I started!

I have a bunch of new nichrome 1600W elements on order that I am expecting to arrive this week. My current plan is to play around with oversizing the number that I install in the roaster and then running each at a maximum of 50%. This way I think if I install 4 x 1600W, I have a total of 6.4kw at 100% or 3.2kw at 50%. This will help keep the watt density down and if I configure the control to alternate pairs of the elements on/off, I should still be able to keep within my available current envelope.

If this doesn't work, then I will need to consider alternatives as you have suggested.

Plan B at this point is an alternative, lower power density, more stable electric element. There have been a few suggested in this thread. From what I can gather these each have their pros and cons. If I attempt to summarise the suggestions made so far, for consideration:

  1. Wind my own nichrome element with appropriately sized wire (gauge/length) as suggested by Allen. I think this might be a viable option, but I need to do some calculations and investigate further. One challenge I have in Australia is sourcing the wire. Anything from China or elsewhere in the world is taking at least a month to arrive!
  2. IR halogen lamps. Based on Allen's input, difficult to mount, but otherwise a reasonable option as they would be responsive and a relatively inexpensive. I'm thinking something like https://au.rs-online.com/web/p/heat-l...s/7960312/. Easilty available and I could install as many as I need across the underside of the drump at a suitable distance.
  3. Tubular as Allen suggests. These look like a good option other than the drawbacks that Allen has already highlighted (cost and responsiveness). As I think danst and others have pointed out though, my roaster will have a reasonable amount of heat inertia though, so I think these might still be responsive enough?
  4. IR Ceramic. I don't know much about these, but they look like they might provide a good heat density and be a good, robust option.
  5. Induction cooktop coil. I like the idea of this, although I don't know enough about this option to know whether it is really viable. Control of the heat is an unknown to me. Can I control this with a TC4+/Arduino, or will I need to use some other method - I need to do some more research on this. Mounting is also an issue as danst has pointed out.. To get close to 4kw, I would need 2 x 2kw coils mounted next to each other. My initial thinking is that I would mount the coils to a ferrite "baffle" that sits under the drum. The coils would then heat the baffle


Plan C. I also have mains gas (natural gas) piped to the location where I am planning to install the roaster, so this might end up being a better solution.

Plan D. I do have 3-phase 240V to my property, but I would need to get an electrician in to run 3-phase to a location where I can run the roaster. Trades are expensive in australia, so this could easily exceed $600 - $800 on its own. And I would still need to solve the problem of which element to use.

Too many options!

Anyway, thanks again to all for your suggestions and input. I am taking this one step at a time. I will let you know how I go with my nichrome tests.
Edited by pjvdl on 07/15/2020 10:16 PM
-- Paul

ECM Rocket espresso
Eureka Mignon grinder
500g BBQ rotisserie roaster
1kg drum roaster (under construction)
 
renatoa
For induction you don't need so much power
Compared with a drum with an external heater, where the heat goes in all directions, and only a good insulation drive it back to the drum, for induction the losses are much much lower, all the power goes into the drum metal, and from there directly to beans.
Insulation role for induction is less critical as for a heater outside the drum, it is there just to keep the heat inside drum, a simple heat reflective foil can do this job maybe better than a ceramic blanket.

Plan E: ceramic radiant plate with gas burner: small and focused heat:
https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/MELTEM-RAD...3386665809
 
allenb
I very much like the idea of the efficient nature of induction heating and renatoa is right that insulation would be much less of an issue. In addition to the induction heater, one will need to design and install a convection heater for preheating intake air as a result of needed exhausting of chaff and smoke. Unfortunately, power requirements for enough air throughput to remove chaff and smoke for a 1kg drum will be at least 1.5 kw for a 10-15 cfm flow. Obviously, with enough heat to the drum, one could omit heating the air but wonder if heating and cooling at the same time might have a negative effect on roast quality?
1/2 lb and 1 lb drum, Siemens Sirocco fluidbed, presspot, chemex, cajun biggin brewer from the backwoods of Louisiana
 
pjvdl

Quote

renatoa wrote:

For induction you don't need so much power
Compared with a drum with an external heater, where the heat goes in all directions, and only a good insulation drive it back to the drum, for induction the losses are much much lower, all the power goes into the drum metal, and from there directly to beans.
Insulation role for induction is less critical as for a heater outside the drum, it is there just to keep the heat inside drum, a simple heat reflective foil can do this job maybe better than a ceramic blanket.

Plan E: ceramic radiant plate with gas burner: small and focused heat:
https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/MELTEM-RAD...3386665809


Your point regarding the necessary power is an interesting one. For this to work, are you suggesting that the induction coil be mounted directly to the drum then? I had imagined that the coil would be mounted to a stationary buffle that sits just under the drum. This baffle would be ferrite and act as the heater. So while this would still be much more efficient than a heater that is heating the air, there might still be some losses. Have I got this wrong?

If I go down the gas route, then I like the idea of an IR ceramic plate.

Quote

allenb wrote:

I very much like the idea of the efficient nature of induction heating and renatoa is right that insulation would be much less of an issue. In addition to the induction heater, one will need to design and install a convection heater for preheating intake air as a result of needed exhausting of chaff and smoke. Unfortunately, power requirements for enough air throughput to remove chaff and smoke for a 1kg drum will be at least 1.5 kw for a 10-15 cfm flow. Obviously, with enough heat to the drum, one could omit heating the air but wonder if heating and cooling at the same time might have a negative effect on roast quality?


Combining induction with a lower power nichrome pre-heater is an interesting idea! If I can't get nichrome going on its own, this might be my new preferred alternative if I can work out how to control the induction power and mount it
-- Paul

ECM Rocket espresso
Eureka Mignon grinder
500g BBQ rotisserie roaster
1kg drum roaster (under construction)
 
renatoa
Induction coil should be mounted as close to the drum, without touching it.
No baffle, the drum itself will heat by induction, as a stainless steel pot placed on the induction plate.
The only difference versus a kitchen usage is that you don't heat the bottom, but the side of the "pot".

Regarding control... yeah, this is a hot potato...
I would start with manual control, using the heater power panel, to discover the power % - ET temperature relationship.
Interfacing with Arduino is not a simple task, because there are no low voltage inside such devices, even the buttons are line operated, i.e. there is line voltage on all the buttons... so at first sight you should use relays, or optocouplers for interface... doable for an Arduino insider, not so simple for the average Joe.

Allenb point is great, cold intake air wouldn't be a good idea... so let's address this with the following approach: what if the exhaust will be the air between the drum and the outer oven wall? This way, the power apparently wasted as radiation outside the drum will be used to heat the air for exhaust, thus a save...
 
allenb

Quote

Extracting from that plastic support and mould it with hot air on the drum curvature is the most difficult part of the conversion job.


This might be a fun project for someone with a 3D printer if there is a printable plastic with high enough working temperature.
1/2 lb and 1 lb drum, Siemens Sirocco fluidbed, presspot, chemex, cajun biggin brewer from the backwoods of Louisiana
 
pjvdl
My Aliexpress order of nichrome elements finally arrived on the weekend, allowing me to run some more tests; both inside the roasting chamber and independently.

I have configured the heater assembly with 2 x 1600W nichrome heater coils mounted in 40mm diameter tubes, connected to my centrifugal fan via a baffle to ensure an even split of airflow between the two coils (see photos - you will note that I have removed the drum from the roasting chamber for one of the tests). I have also played around with different methods for ensuring adequate, even airflow around the elements in the tube. Although the elements were all supplied with mica paper wrapping, I have discarded this in favour of spacers at either end of the tube to ensure the element is well centred in the tube. This seems to work better than the mica paper, as the paper seems to restrict airflow too much.

With this configuration, if I link the maximum duty cycle of the heaters to the fan duty cycle, I have found that I can reliably run the heater coils at 90% of fan power. ie. with fan at 90%, max heat is 81%. This means that my max power is 90% or 2 x 1600W => 2880W.

From my reading on this forum, 2.9kW should be enough for a 700g - 800g roast or so, however in my testing (below), I have found that is can barely cope with 500g. This is in a double skinned stainlless steel roaster (albeit with no insulation). In addition, this heater configuration is not really what I originally planned, as it does not really provide any radiant heat directly to the drum. So although I have been able to show that I can use nichrome heaters, I am struggling to deliver the power in the way I want.

I am contemplating installing a 3rd 1600w under the drum to provide a level of radiant heat, which would be possible, but is another whole design exercise.

Sadly, I think my conclusion is that it is going to be difficult to use nichrome to deliver a radiant/convention combination of heat sufficient to roast anything like the 1kg that I had originally designed this roaster for. In fact, except for induction, I wonder if it is even possible to roast 1kg with only 4kw of electric heat.

I am keen on renatoa's recommendations around induction, and based on this suggestion I have explored this option, but the lack of control may mean this is a non-starter, as I had hoped to be able to do at least some profiling using Artisan/Arduino/TC4Plus. When I get some more time, I may just buy a cheap Ikea benchtop induction cooktop to tear apart and test.

In the meantime I htink I am going to tweek my existing setup to see how far I can push it.

Test results

This can pre-heat the roasting chamber to 250C in around 6 minutes. My initial tests with some old green beans are:

500g roast: it can roast 500g of beans in around 13 minutes, if I drop heat power to 60% on initial charge, gradually raising heat power to 90% through the roast to 1st crack and dropping back to around 30% power.
1000g roast: around 18 minutes, even at higher heat percentage
pjvdl attached the following images:
20200726_225500resized.jpg 20200726_225455resized.jpg 20200723_153700resized.jpg

-- Paul

ECM Rocket espresso
Eureka Mignon grinder
500g BBQ rotisserie roaster
1kg drum roaster (under construction)
 
allenb
Shoot us some additional data:

Amps and voltage at 90% power (if you have an ammeter)
Air temp leaving the elements (at least 1" past the end of the tube)
Color of nichrome (pure yellow or closer to dull orange?)
1/2 lb and 1 lb drum, Siemens Sirocco fluidbed, presspot, chemex, cajun biggin brewer from the backwoods of Louisiana
 
pjvdl

Quote

allenb wrote:

Shoot us some additional data:

Amps and voltage at 90% power (if you have an ammeter)
Air temp leaving the elements (at least 1" past the end of the tube)
Color of nichrome (pure yellow or closer to dull orange?)


I'm glad you asked :)

I use 240V power. My ammeter is showing around 15Amps at 100% power (which I can operate for a few minutes before burning out an elements). This is across both elements in parallel. My setup uses a slow (8Hz) PWM signal to control power to the heater (eg. 50% is 500ms on alternating with 500ms on), I believe that the percentage value is rounded down to the nearest 125ms (8Hz), so 90% means that it is using 100% power for 7/8 of a second. This switching of power causes my ammeter reading to fluxtuate, so difficult to confirm reading, but based on my understanding, it should still be pulling the full 15Amps for 7/8 of each second.

I have run a number of tests with different combinations of fan power and heater power. I have attached the results of these tests below. The temperature readings in these tests were taken at the exit of the heating element tube (within 2mm).

I find colour to be somewhat subjective, but the photos I posted in the previous show the elements at the maximum colour I can consistently run without blowing one. Bright orange?
pjvdl attached the following image:
screenshot_from_2020-07-29_22-36-03resized.png

-- Paul

ECM Rocket espresso
Eureka Mignon grinder
500g BBQ rotisserie roaster
1kg drum roaster (under construction)
 
renatoa
You should use 1 Hz PWM for at least 2% (1.67% on 60Hz) control resolution... 8Hz will degrade significantly your control precision.
Are you using TC4 ? why not going with ICC ?
 
Jump to Forum:

Similar Threads

Thread Forum Replies Last Post
1 lb drum build Drum Roasters 51 09/03/2020 9:47 PM
Frankenstein’s Monster Whirley Pop Build Building a Coffee Roaster 6 08/27/2020 10:22 AM
What kind of fluid bed should I build? WHAT SHOULD I BUY OR MAKE 16 08/19/2020 1:07 PM
My 3kg propane fluid bed roaster build Fluidbed Roaster 5 08/18/2020 1:42 PM
My 1-2 KG drum roaster Drum Roasters 7 08/16/2020 3:25 AM
Homeroasters Association Logo, and all Content, Images, and Icons © 2005-2016 Homeroasters Association - Logos are the property of their respective owners.
Powered by PHP-Fusion copyright © 2002 - 2020 by Nick Jones.
Released as free software without warranties under GNU Affero GPL v3.
Designed with by NetriX