topbanner.gif
Login
Username

Password




Not a member yet?
Click here to register.

Forgotten your password?
Request a new one here.
Shoutbox
You must login to post a message.

pisanoal
Offline
· 05/27/2020 10:14 AM
Anyone else have issues seeing the whole window of a thread when accessing from a mobile phone? Any fixes?

allenb
OfflineAdmin
· 04/02/2020 4:50 AM
Morning Ed, I haven't done any green coffee hoarding yet but am hoping the supplies don't end up like the toilet paper isles!

snwcmpr
Offline
· 03/31/2020 2:53 PM
Hey Ed. Thanks. roar

homeroaster
Offline
· 03/31/2020 11:21 AM
Hey quarantined home roasters! I hope you have great coffee! If they have a run on coffee, I hope you're set with your great home roast! Find me on Facebook! Ed Needham

snwcmpr
Offline
· 03/25/2020 11:49 AM
New Rochelle in the news. I think of you every time I hear it. ... Please stay safe.

Users Online
Guests Online: 7

Members Online: 0

Total Members: 6,587
Newest Member: Boki
In Memory Of Ginny
Donations

Latest Donations
Anonymous - 5.00
Anonymous - 5.00
renatoa - 2.00
JitterzZ - 2.01
renatoa - 2.00

View Thread

Who is here? 1 guest(s)
 Print Thread
Question about wiring a dryer element
dstedman
Hey -

I am wiring a dryer element for use in a ~1kg fluid bed roaster. I am hoping to use a range outlet/cord if possible, which in the US has 2 hot wires at 120v and a neutral line. When I am wiring directly to the heating element, am I supposed to incorporate the neutral line? I wouldn't think so, based on what I have researched, right? Is it super necessary to ground the circuit or will it be fine with just the hot lines? I would prefer to not modify the outlet to add ground if possible.

My fan blower is on a separate 120v circuit.

Thanks guys!
 
renatoa
Ground is for safety. And precision of measurements.
You can get ground from another outlet, with a separate wire.
 
allenb

Quote

dstedman wrote:

Hey -

I am wiring a dryer element for use in a ~1kg fluid bed roaster. I am hoping to use a range outlet/cord if possible, which in the US has 2 hot wires at 120v and a neutral line. When I am wiring directly to the heating element, am I supposed to incorporate the neutral line? I wouldn't think so, based on what I have researched, right? Is it super necessary to ground the circuit or will it be fine with just the hot lines? I would prefer to not modify the outlet to add ground if possible.

My fan blower is on a separate 120v circuit.

Thanks guys!


Dryers prior to 2000 were only required to have two hots (two 120 v feeds out of phase from each other) and a neutral which was also tied to ground at the panel so it acted as a ground and a neutral so the dryer's motor could be fed 120 by tapping off of one hot and the neutral/ground.

As long as your circuit only needs single phase 240 (two hots) and no 120 volt circuits feeding 120 volt motors or power supplies, then all you need is two hots (A and B phase from your breaker panel) and a ground to the metal chassis parts of your roaster. With this being said, the ground cannot be used to conduct any electricity in your circuit but must be used solely for safety grounding purposes. You asked if you should incorporate the neutral line to your heating element. No. A dryer heating element uses single phase 240 (2 hots 180 degrees out of phase) and does not use a neutral. Other parts of a dryer needs the neutral/ground feed but in your case you only want the two hots and ground to chassis. The two hots go to the two ends of the element, the ground goes to chassis and yes, you need a ground to keep you from being cooked but is only for safety.
1/2 lb and 1 lb drum, Siemens Sirocco fluidbed, presspot, chemex, cajun biggin brewer from the backwoods of Louisiana
 
dstedman

Quote

allenb wrote:

Quote

dstedman wrote:

Hey -

I am wiring a dryer element for use in a ~1kg fluid bed roaster. I am hoping to use a range outlet/cord if possible, which in the US has 2 hot wires at 120v and a neutral line. When I am wiring directly to the heating element, am I supposed to incorporate the neutral line? I wouldn't think so, based on what I have researched, right? Is it super necessary to ground the circuit or will it be fine with just the hot lines? I would prefer to not modify the outlet to add ground if possible.

My fan blower is on a separate 120v circuit.

Thanks guys!


Dryers prior to 2000 were only required to have two hots (two 120 v feeds out of phase from each other) and a neutral which was also tied to ground at the panel so it acted as a ground and a neutral so the dryer's motor could be fed 120 by tapping off of one hot and the neutral/ground.

As long as your circuit only needs single phase 240 (two hots) and no 120 volt circuits feeding 120 volt motors or power supplies, then all you need is two hots (A and B phase from your breaker panel) and a ground to the metal chassis parts of your roaster. With this being said, the ground cannot be used to conduct any electricity in your circuit but must be used solely for safety grounding purposes. You asked if you should incorporate the neutral line to your heating element. No. A dryer heating element uses single phase 240 (2 hots 180 degrees out of phase) and does not use a neutral. Other parts of a dryer needs the neutral/ground feed but in your case you only want the two hots and ground to chassis. The two hots go to the two ends of the element, the ground goes to chassis and yes, you need a ground to keep you from being cooked but is only for safety.



Thanks for the very helpful response. I think I will run my ground from a different outlet on the same breaker to avoid changing the 240v outlet to the newer 4 prong version. Appreciate the help!
 
allenb

Quote

Thanks for the very helpful response. I think I will run my ground from a different outlet on the same breaker to avoid changing the 240v outlet to the newer 4 prong version. Appreciate the help


If it were me, at my house, assuming you are going to utilize a 3 terminal existing dryer outlet with two hots and a neutral/ground, I would simply pull the neutral connection from the ground connection in the breaker panel which will leave you with 2 hots and a ground and label it as such so you never try and run a dryer on it or better yet, change the receptacle to a 3 terminal twist lock so it won't allow a dryer appliance to plug into it and you won't have a makeshift ground being routed from another outlet. This is assuming you have experience reworking things in breaker panels and if not, hire an electrician to make the change for you to lessen the chance for arcs and sparks or worse.
1/2 lb and 1 lb drum, Siemens Sirocco fluidbed, presspot, chemex, cajun biggin brewer from the backwoods of Louisiana
 
Jump to Forum:

Similar Threads

Thread Forum Replies Last Post
Behmor 1600 question Roasting Coffee 9 05/11/2020 5:37 PM
Dumb question - disable auto cool Dataloggers/Controllers/Rate of Rise Meters 8 02/23/2020 10:36 PM
Heat gun element Electric and Gas Heat Sources 2 02/13/2020 5:02 PM
Question On Adjusting Thermoprobe Input Reading Roasting Coffee 4 01/26/2020 6:15 AM
West Bend Poppery I Fan Boost Wiring Popcorn Popper roasting 15 01/16/2020 2:02 AM
Homeroasters Association Logo, and all Content, Images, and Icons © 2005-2016 Homeroasters Association - Logos are the property of their respective owners.
Powered by PHP-Fusion copyright © 2002 - 2020 by Nick Jones.
Released as free software without warranties under GNU Affero GPL v3.
Designed with by NetriX