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JackH
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· 02/11/2020 1:10 PM
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jqaman
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· 02/11/2020 9:35 AM
The Behmor lol

snwcmpr
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· 02/10/2020 10:25 AM
CoffeeRoastersClub
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rogguy
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· 02/06/2020 7:24 AM
Searched but no can find, but does anyone on here use the roasters made by CRC (Coffee Roasters Club) in Connecticut?

JackH
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· 02/05/2020 2:50 PM
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Fluidbed Roaster project
jbrux4

Quote

CK wrote:

Good silicone to use. Here's a link to a technique that works well.

https://www.instructables.com/id/Home...nd-tubing/


Thanks for this great find. It will come in very handy in many situations.
R/
Jared
 
snwcmpr
I found this high temp sealer.
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07...G69RC?th=1
Up to 600 degrees.
Edited by snwcmpr on 01/28/2020 12:05 PM
--------------
Backwoods Roaster
"I wish I could taste as well as I wish I could roast."

As Abraham Lincoln said "Do not trust everything you read on the internet".
 
cdrake39
Well, after some contemplation (and convincing from another user - thanks jbrux4!) I decided to use tri clamp fittings in my design. The primary reasons for this change are ease of cleaning, modular setup which allows for easier upgrades in the future, and aesthetics. The photo shows the concept for this design. Lots of design details to work out, but I'll have a better idea of how to tackle them when the parts arrive. I'm hoping to permanently affix a mesh gasket to the bottom of the 4" sight glass so I can remove that section (without having beans fall everywhere) to remove the beans when roasted.
cdrake39 attached the following image:
20200202_214616.png
 
renatoa
Is there any reason to lower the level of cyclone so much ?

Is the heater in the picture, or outside the box ?
 
cdrake39

Quote

renatoa wrote:

Is there any reason to lower the level of cyclone so much ?

Is the heater in the picture, or outside the box ?


No reason at all. Do you see any disadvantages with this design? It may be too late for me to change anything on this design, but I'm open to ideas for improvements!

The heating element will be in the straight section of piping just below the roast chamber.
 
renatoa
I see no functional disadvantage for exhaust, just aesthetics, for my eyes, too much tubing. Grin

In the lower area, I am curious to hear how much presure is lost by the 90 degrees pipe turning just below the perforated plate.
What about an asymmetric design? they are so rare... and I like them more than centered fountains. Grin
I mean an 135 degrees turn instead 90 degrees, and air entrance lateral shifted from the center.
 
cdrake39

Quote

renatoa wrote:

I see no functional disadvantage for exhaust, just aesthetics, for my eyes, too much tubing. Grin

In the lower area, I am curious to hear how much presure is lost by the 90 degrees pipe turning just below the perforated plate.
What about an asymmetric design? they are so rare... and I like them more than centered fountains. Grin
I mean an 135 degrees turn instead 90 degrees, and air entrance lateral shifted from the center.


Fair points! I enjoy the look of all the tubing - but I may be alone in that :P

Yeah, I'm anxious to test that as well. My backup plan is to mount the blower so it directs air vertically through the straight section rather than through a 90.

I actually thought about the lateral design originally (similar to Alex Campbell's build - I believe he is a user on here) with a plenum situated to the side of the roaster and the bean dumping mechanism at the center. But instead I opted for this design. I'm sure once I get to using it there will be changes made here and there to optimize performance.
 
CK
Nice photorealistic rendering. Are those your own CAD parts rendered, or do you download generic files from an open database?

I kind of like the shine and muscle of the SS pipes.
 
cdrake39

Quote

CK wrote:

Nice photorealistic rendering. Are those your own CAD parts rendered, or do you download generic files from an open database?

I kind of like the shine and muscle of the SS pipes.


Thanks! Some of the parts were found on McMaster-Carr (elbows, straight tubing and clamps), the SSR and Arduino were found on GrabCAD, and the rest (cyclone, blower, sight glass, reducers, DCPSU, enclosure and base) were designed by myself. I'll likely 3D print an enclosure of sorts for the electrical components.

I agree, I think the SS pipes look fantastic :)
 
cdrake39
Hey everyone - just working on the roaster wiring and had a question about thermal fuses.
A) I understand it is a safety feature, but I've seen some threads where people have removed the fuse and modded the thermostat to get extra heat from the element. Is this actually necessary?
B) The heat element (removed from a heat gun) did not have a thermal fuse. How do I go about sizing the correct thermal fuse? I would rather not size it too low and have it burn out before even reaching roast temps, but at the same time would want to size it appropriately so the element doesn't burn out
C) How does one install the thermal fuse? I assume solder is out due to the temps. Do you just loop it around the riveted connections on the heat element? (see pic)
cdrake39 attached the following image:
heatngelement.jpg

Edited by cdrake39 on 02/10/2020 8:39 AM
 
dstedman

Quote

cdrake39 wrote:

Well, after some contemplation (and convincing from another user - thanks jbrux4!) I decided to use tri clamp fittings in my design. The primary reasons for this change are ease of cleaning, modular setup which allows for easier upgrades in the future, and aesthetics. The photo shows the concept for this design. Lots of design details to work out, but I'll have a better idea of how to tackle them when the parts arrive. I'm hoping to permanently affix a mesh gasket to the bottom of the 4" sight glass so I can remove that section (without having beans fall everywhere) to remove the beans when roasted.


Would you eventually want to make a list of the parts you're using for future builders? Could be helpful - I'm having trouble finding the stainless steel parts that make up your tubing and the base of your roast chamber!
 
cdrake39

Quote

dstedman wrote:

Quote

cdrake39 wrote:

Well, after some contemplation (and convincing from another user - thanks jbrux4!) I decided to use tri clamp fittings in my design. The primary reasons for this change are ease of cleaning, modular setup which allows for easier upgrades in the future, and aesthetics. The photo shows the concept for this design. Lots of design details to work out, but I'll have a better idea of how to tackle them when the parts arrive. I'm hoping to permanently affix a mesh gasket to the bottom of the 4" sight glass so I can remove that section (without having beans fall everywhere) to remove the beans when roasted.


Would you eventually want to make a list of the parts you're using for future builders? Could be helpful - I'm having trouble finding the stainless steel parts that make up your tubing and the base of your roast chamber!


I can certainly do that. I want to evaluate how the current design performs before putting together a detailed parts list. There will likely be some changes to the design as it's being tested.
 
CK

Quote

cdrake39 wrote:

Hey everyone - just working on the roaster wiring and had a question about thermal fuses.
A) I understand it is a safety feature, but I've seen some threads where people have removed the fuse and modded the thermostat to get extra heat from the element. Is this actually necessary?
B) The heat element (removed from a heat gun) did not have a thermal fuse. How do I go about sizing the correct thermal fuse? I would rather not size it too low and have it burn out before even reaching roast temps, but at the same time would want to size it appropriately so the element doesn't burn out
C) How does one install the thermal fuse? I assume solder is out due to the temps. Do you just loop it around the riveted connections on the heat element? (see pic)


The top right and the bottom left image seem to show your heater's safety shut off switch. If it is similar to the ones I've worked with, there will be a tiny piece of metal under the copper contact bridge. If the air gets too hot around the element, the temperature sensitive tiny metal piece deforms breaking the electrical connection for the heater. As it cools it resets to its original position and the element is still intact. If this safety is removed with tweezers the electrical connection will permit higher temps at the risk of burning out your element or setting fire to your machine... it will not switch off for a high temperature condition with the safety bypassed.
 
cdrake39

Quote

CK wrote:

Quote

cdrake39 wrote:

Hey everyone - just working on the roaster wiring and had a question about thermal fuses.
A) I understand it is a safety feature, but I've seen some threads where people have removed the fuse and modded the thermostat to get extra heat from the element. Is this actually necessary?
B) The heat element (removed from a heat gun) did not have a thermal fuse. How do I go about sizing the correct thermal fuse? I would rather not size it too low and have it burn out before even reaching roast temps, but at the same time would want to size it appropriately so the element doesn't burn out
C) How does one install the thermal fuse? I assume solder is out due to the temps. Do you just loop it around the riveted connections on the heat element? (see pic)


The top right and the bottom left image seem to show your heater's safety shut off switch. If it is similar to the ones I've worked with, there will be a tiny piece of metal under the copper contact bridge. If the air gets too hot around the element, the temperature sensitive tiny metal piece deforms breaking the electrical connection for the heater. As it cools it resets to its original position and the element is still intact. If this safety is removed with tweezers the electrical connection will permit higher temps at the risk of burning out your element or setting fire to your machine... it will not switch off for a high temperature condition with the safety bypassed.


Thanks for the info CK! I decided for the cost (only about $1.50 per fuse) that I'll install a fuse in addition to this switch that's already in place. I saw in the TC4+ instructable that the popcorn heating element had both (see pic). It looks to be just looped around the rivet on the element. Here's a link to the instructable I'm referring to https://www.instructables.com/id/Ardu...e-Roaster/
cdrake39 attached the following image:
20200215_151134.jpg
 
renatoa
The reseatable fuse is 180 C, to avoid popcorn burn, it is actively working on-off during popcorn normal operation. This is the fuse that must bypass for roasting coffee, because 180 C is too low for FC and development.
The other is a normal fuse, one time permanent melting at 250-300C, for safety against home fire. Never heard someone tripped during coffee roasting.
You would need a mix of both, a reseatable fuse having the safety fuse range.
 
cdrake39

Quote

renatoa wrote:

The reseatable fuse is 180 C, to avoid popcorn burn, it is actively working on-off during popcorn normal operation. This is the fuse that must bypass for roasting coffee, because 180 C is too low for FC and development.
The other is a normal fuse, one time permanent melting at 250-300C, for safety against home fire. Never heard someone tripped during coffee roasting.
You would need a mix of both, a reseatable fuse having the safety fuse range.


That makes sense. Just to be clear - that photo of the popcorn element isn't my setup, but someone else's. My heat gun element I have came with a resettable switch but no thermal fuse. I guess I'll just have to assume the switch on the heat gun element is sufficient for roasting and I'll install the one time fuse for safety sake. The ones I purchased are rated for 227C, do you think that will be sufficient?
 
renatoa
Too low, imo... I hope is a typo and it is 272 C :)
In my setup the environment temperature, i.e. the air in proximity of beans, is frequently bigger than 250 C.
Another example more related to a hotgun style, the Gene exhaust air at glass cylinder inlet is 300-330C for a standard mains voltage, varying wildly with mains.
 
cdrake39

Quote

renatoa wrote:

Too low, imo... I hope is a typo and it is 272 C :)
In my setup the environment temperature, i.e. the air in proximity of beans, is frequently bigger than 250 C.
Another example more related to a hotgun style, the Gene exhaust air at glass cylinder inlet is 300-330C for a standard mains voltage, varying wildly with mains.


I wish it was a typo as well, but unfortunately it is not :p
Good thing they are cheap, I'll order more with a higher temp range. Thanks for the feedback!
 
cdrake39
Starting to sort out the coding for my DIY roaster and had a few questions
If this should be moved to the TC4+ discussion please let me know :)

1) I'll be connecting the heater to OT1 and my DC Fan controller to the PWM pin on IO3. I assume this means I will need to use the CONFIG_PWM configuration mode?

2)If I use this mode, and do not have a fan connected to OT2 (but rather IO3), will the HTR_CUTOFF_FAN_VAL section of the code still function?

3)For those of you using the HTR_CUTOFF_FAN_VAL, what threshold are you using for the cutoff value?

Thanks in advance for your help!
 
greencardigan
Yes CONFIG_PWM is correct.

Yes, the HTR_CUTOFF_FAN_VAL should work in all modes.

The value you choose for HTR_CUTOFF_FAN_VAL will be dependent on your specific roaster. You should have it set to a fan value that will allow enough airflow through your heater to stop it overheating. I have mine set about 10% lower than the lowest fan value I need during a roast.

I recommend doing some initial testing without the greater connected so you can confirm everything is working correctly.
 
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