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JackH
12/14/2019 4:07 AM
I read somewhere that higher elevations have faster roast time and require somewhat lower temperatures. air is thin and has less Oxygen

allenb
12/14/2019 12:44 AM
Yes, 1st off, you must use only Panama Esmeralda Geisha beans and be sure to only roast on Saturdays. Actually, this isn't completely true. Please post in all about roasters forum. Thx!

wjohndon4566
12/13/2019 10:36 AM
I’m at 9,000 feet elevation, is there any special adjustments that need to be made to roast using an SR 540 at this elevation?

snwcmpr
12/07/2019 9:29 AM
roar

snwcmpr
11/27/2019 11:44 AM
greenman

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Are heat guns food safe?
marcov
Building a homemade fluidbed roaster based on a heat gun sounds appealing. The heater has plenty of watts and the fan blows way stronger than a popper.

However I am quite concerned about food safety of using this kind of devices for something I am going to drink. Have you ever considered this, or do you have any information to share?
 
Spyderman24-7
Any particular reason why? I use one and have no regrets whatsoever. Look at the air we breathe, water we drink, processed foods we sometimes eat, etc. Those things in our daily lives are far from great, but is what it is. I personally think adding electric heat to something is better than using other heat sources such as natural gas, etc.

Also, I don't see how anybody would consider a popper to be a safer alternative than a heat gun. Now I will say to invest a good quality heat gun, as in all metal if you can go that route. I would question the safety/longevity of the really cheap heat guns that are primarily plastic.
 
renatoa
Actually, the poppers are somewhat nocive, if you think the RC is made from aluminium and exposed to 250C temperatures, while even much lower temperature cooking pots are now removed from the market, if not having any glassing or enamel coating.
Espresso machines already gave up with aluminium boilers, I think you know...

A hotgun, to be food safe should be made from stainless steel and ceramics.
Mica is questionable, and azbest is already banned.
 
marcov
Thanks for answering.

The reason to ask this is that I am afraid that any of the materials an heat gun is made may leak some toxic or carcinogen particles, and heat usually amplify leaking or makes things worse.

I am thinking about materials like galvanized or chrome plated steel, phthalates, BPA and asbestos.

The most critical part should be the heating element, as the fas sucks in cold air and plastic enclosures can be stripped out when building a homemade roaster.

The reason why I would consider a popper food safer than a heat gun is that a popper is designed to process food.

I know we are already exposed to a lot of other toxic elements, but I usually try to do what's in my control to not make my food more toxic (eg: I eat non-organic food, but I avoid having hot food in contact with plastic containers).
 
marcov
renatoa wrote:

Actually, the poppers are somewhat nocive, if you think the RC is made from aluminium and exposed to 250C temperatures.


Interesting. What RC stands for?
 
Brandon
marcov wrote:

renatoa wrote:

Actually, the poppers are somewhat nocive, if you think the RC is made from aluminium and exposed to 250C temperatures.


Interesting. What RC stands for?


Roast Chamber
 
JackH
Acronyms again.
---Jack

KKTO Roaster.
 
renatoa
Ok, no more acronyms from now Grin
 
allenb
renatoa wrote:

Actually, the poppers are somewhat nocive, if you think the RC is made from aluminium and exposed to 250C temperatures, while even much lower temperature cooking pots are now removed from the market, if not having any glassing or enamel coating.
Espresso machines already gave up with aluminium boilers, I think you know...



Every commercial kitchen I've been through lately uses uncoated aluminum as their vessel of choice. Nothing wrong with using aluminum even at 500 F +.

https://www.globe...10719.html

As far as heatguns with questionable materials in their construction? You will encounter 100 x the nasties from your heatgun just by getting into your automobile for a stroll down the road and in addition, the crap entrained in the air in your area of the world.

Build smart but don't get too worried about heatguns and aluminum.
1/2 lb and 1 lb drum, Siemens Sirocco fluidbed, presspot, chemex, cajun biggin brewer from the backwoods of Louisiana
 
coffeeroastersclub
How right Allen is. What people need to do is live on a farm for awhile. Open you eyes to what is important and what is not.

Len
"If this is coffee, please bring me some tea but if this is tea, please bring me some coffee." ~Abraham Lincoln
 
http://www.coffeeroastersclub.com
marcov
coffeeroastersclub wrote:
Open you eyes to what is important and what is not.


I don't see what's wrong in being aware of a potential risk and asking these kind of questions.
 
JackH
Your question was a good one and your concerns are valid when building a roaster.
There are many using heat guns in heat gun/dog bowl and bread machine builds.

I would purchase a high quality heat gun and steer clear of the cheap plastic types.
Purchase one with a heat/cool switch so you can keep the heating element alive longer.
When I am done roasting, I run the heat gun in cool for a while to protect the heating element.

Please ask questions, it is what this site is all about.
---Jack

KKTO Roaster.
 
JitterzZ
JackH wrote:

Your question was a good one and your concerns are valid when building a roaster.
There are many using heat guns in heat gun/dog bowl and bread machine builds.

I would purchase a high quality heat gun and steer clear of the cheap plastic types.
Purchase one with a heat/cool switch so you can keep the heating element alive longer.
When I am done roasting, I run the heat gun in cool for a while to protect the heating element.

Please ask questions, it is what this site is all about.


good post
 
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