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Homeroasters.org » ALL ABOUT ROASTERS » Popcorn Popper roasting
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Powered Victorio hand cranked popper
Ozo
I have been roasting for years with a Back to Basics Whirley Pop style (stainless steel) popcorn popper turned with a cordless drill. Recently I decided to upgrade because the lid was failing which was adding to the already awkward set up. I could install new clips and continue using it but want to start fresh I chose the best one I could find which is the Victorio as recommended by Sweet Marias. To be honest (albeit disloyal) I got it at Amazon for $45 total. The Victorio has just one large clamp..

The Victorio has a flexible drive while the WP had gears and the drill was mounted vertically. The vertical mounting was awkward but the horizontal mounting to the flex drive is much simpler to set up. I am waiting for the Victorio to arrive so am in the planning stage but I did a mock up with the WP and a cordless drill, see photo. I hope I do not have to shorten the Victorios handle to facilitate attachment but will do that if required.

I am currently using the Coleman propane stove which I used with the WP. The drill is held at the correct height for that stove using a Panavise which is mounted to a turkey board from Goodwill that I use for electronics repair. I plan to build a dedicated support and will have a dedicated corded drill. It is a mite disconcerting to have the battery die mid roast.

i.imgur.com/thkw3Az.jpg

Victorio VKP1160

i.imgur.com/ulY8Y8V.jpg

i.imgur.com/9p3KVfi.jpg
Edited by Ozo on 08-10-2018 09:29
Tim


"Espresso is a miracle of chemistry in a cup."
Andrea Illy
 
ChicagoJohn
I like the simplicity. How do you control the time-temperature profile with a set up like this?
So many beans; so little time....
 
Ozo
ChicagoJohn wrote:

I like the simplicity. How do you control the time-temperature profile with a set up like this?


I just turn the burner on high and rotate the stirrer rapidly and thats it I have never turned down the heat to change the profile. The results "in the cup" are fantastic so I have never experimented, never even had a temp probe in there either. I keep the size down, 2 cups of green beans.
Tim


"Espresso is a miracle of chemistry in a cup."
Andrea Illy
 
renatoa
How do you know the burner pressure is constant ?

So you have PID on the espresso machine, but don't feel the need for more control for roasting... while I was convinced exactly about the reverse Grin
Kidding, you could be lucky finding the right quantity for your machine natural curve, and stick with it...
There are coffees and coffees though... washed and naturals, hard or not, different altitudes...
 
Ozo
renatoa wrote:

How do you know the burner pressure is constant ?

So you have PID on the espresso machine, but don't feel the need for more control for roasting... while I was convinced exactly about the reverse Grin
Kidding, you could be lucky finding the right quantity for your machine natural curve, and stick with it...
There are coffees and coffees though... washed and naturals, hard or not, different altitudes...


I have been using the same origin which is dry processed, high altitude, for a long time but soon am going to do some experimenting with different origins so would be more inclined to experiment with the temp. I have been roasting to Full City so I assume it is not as critical. Also, I am at sea level in Florida and atmospheric pressure and ambient temps are rather constant and again assume the propane bottle pressure is somewhat constant.
Edited by Ozo on 08-10-2018 09:33
Tim


"Espresso is a miracle of chemistry in a cup."
Andrea Illy
 
ChicagoJohn

I just turn the burner on high and rotate the stirrer rapidly and thats it I have never turned down the heat to change the profile. The results "in the cup" are fantastic so I have never experimented, never even had a temp probe in there either. I keep the size down, 2 cups of green beans.


That's great -- again simplicity, and I have the same criterion you do: What I like, period. Sounds like you're batch size is about 340 gm, same as I'm using but with an air roaster I built incorporating way, way too much measurement and control complexities. It works OK, but I think since my goal is making a product I like in the morning (and another one for my wife who loves espresso), if I were starting all over again, I'd probably try to emulate what you have done and keep it as simple as possible in both design and operation.

As a great contributor here, OldGearHead (OGH) used to tell me, a roaster has a natural curve and if you get things set up right, you can just pretty much do its thing. Sounds like what you have and what I have too, but after a much longer and costlier journey to that destination.

Despite the absence of temperature data, I take it you do go by some observables like sounds of 1st crack, smell, etc? Also, how do you cool you batch down at the end and get rid of chaff?
So many beans; so little time....
 
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Ozo
The roast seems to go along as expected, sounds are distinct and last a while especially 2d crack which takes longer and the violence of that second crack indicates to me that the temp is hot enough but not too hot. The process time is short at about 71/2 minutes as I recall but my memory is suspect. I vaguely recall some problem when the stove was not full blast. It is not a real powerful stove but gets the job done if on high. The beans look very consistent but then it is pretty dark. I do not think I ever saw a roast that was not consistent
Chaff is left in the roaster and on the cooling screen. I have been cooling it by trapping it in two screen colanders which I wave around till it cools down with no smoke and then I throw it on a big tray one bean thick so cools to ambient quite rapidly. However I am close to completing a bucket cooler of my own design. It is small and will only do two cups at a time so is just the right size. It is a vacuum with a clever basket, photos when done. The tiny basket is supported in a bucket but the vac hose is connected directly to the basket so nothing lost. The trick will be sealing it.

The above experience is with Yemen beans, I forget the exact area of origin. I bought so much when it was available that I still have a little left. That is about gone so I have to pick replacements.
Edited by Ozo on 08-10-2018 13:56
Tim


"Espresso is a miracle of chemistry in a cup."
Andrea Illy
 
Ozo
ChicagoJohn wrote:


I just turn the burner on high and rotate the stirrer rapidly and thats it I have never turned down the heat to change the profile. The results "in the cup" are fantastic so I have never experimented, never even had a temp probe in there either. I keep the size down, 2 cups of green beans.


That's great -- again simplicity, and I have the same criterion you do: What I like, period. Sounds like you're batch size is about 340 gm, same as I'm using but with an air roaster I built


Two cups of roasted beans weighs 240 grams at least the ones I now have are, See my new thread regarding the cooler I made.

And I totally agree with your simplicity concept. That is called the KISS principal. Keep It Simple Silly or something like that. The cooler follows that principal.
Tim


"Espresso is a miracle of chemistry in a cup."
Andrea Illy
 
Koffee Kosmo
The roast amount of 240gr green is to small for me

That will only keep me in coffee for a couple of days
If you are good at DIY it’s time to upgrade to a design of your choosing from our DIY section

Just a little encouragement from me

KK
My web site > koffeekosmo.com.au I home roast and I like it :P
Blog - http://koffeekosm...gspot.com/
Bezzera Strega: BNZ MD74 Grinder: 5 Box hand grinders: Pullman Tamper Convex: (KKTO) Turbo Oven Home Roaster: CONA Glass Rod Syphon: Pyrex Brewer:
 
koffeekosmo.com.au
Ozo
Koffee Kosmo wrote:

The roast amount of 240gr green is to small for me

That will only keep me in coffee for a couple of days
If you are good at DIY it’s time to upgrade to a design of your choosing from our DIY section

Just a little encouragement from me

KK


Thank you but, as I said earlier in this thread, I roast twice for a total of 480 grams of green beans which lasts me plenty long. I only drink 2 double shots of espresso daily. I am over 70 and if I drink more than that I can not stop talking, it is not pretty.
i.imgur.com/pf2XODk.jpg

I do roast a single 240 gram batch of decaf and that lasts twice as long as I only drink one double shot daily if that. That is three roasts but I do not get the least bit bored while that is happening so I have no inclination to "upgrade".
Edited by Ozo on 08-12-2018 08:15
Tim


"Espresso is a miracle of chemistry in a cup."
Andrea Illy
 
ChicagoJohn
I only drink 2 double shots of espresso daily. I am over 70 and if I drink more than that I can not stop talking, it is not pretty.:roar



This is why my wife is limited to one double shot a day. Why take chances?
So many beans; so little time....
 
Ozo
ChicagoJohn wrote:

I only drink 2 double shots of espresso daily. I am over 70 and if I drink more than that I can not stop talking, it is not pretty.:roar



This is why my wife is limited to one double shot a day. Why take chances?


See my edited post above. It is what I look like after several double shots.
Tim


"Espresso is a miracle of chemistry in a cup."
Andrea Illy
 
Ozo
Koffee Kosmo wrote:

The roast amount of 240gr green is to small for me

That will only keep me in coffee for a couple of days
If you are good at DIY it’s time to upgrade to a design of your choosing from our DIY section

Just a little encouragement from me

KK

I keep thinking about my reply to your post and would add that although I am ok with DIY if not too complex, I have been drooling over the Hot Top drum roaster which would suit me I think especially as I get older. I do appreciate your encouragement and have been reading about DIY drum roasters as well as Fluid Bed types but they seem too complex for me.

The Hot Top is a bit pricey for me but later I may find the cash. Funny how that works when you dwell on something. I will be looking for a used one. I see a good one on Ebay right now but the auction end date is at a time which finds me without funds.
Edited by Ozo on 08-13-2018 03:18
Tim


"Espresso is a miracle of chemistry in a cup."
Andrea Illy
 
JackH
If it works and meets your coffee needs, then all is well. Unless you like tinkering with gadgets.
---Jack

KKTO Roaster.
 
Koffee Kosmo
Ozo wrote:

Koffee Kosmo wrote:

The roast amount of 240gr green is to small for me

That will only keep me in coffee for a couple of days
If you are good at DIY it’s time to upgrade to a design of your choosing from our DIY section

Just a little encouragement from me

KK

I keep thinking about my reply to your post and would add that although I am ok with DIY if not too complex, I have been drooling over the Hot Top drum roaster which would suit me I think especially as I get older. I do appreciate your encouragement and have been reading about DIY drum roasters as well as Fluid Bed types but they seem too complex for me.

The Hot Top is a bit pricey for me but later I may find the cash. Funny how that works when you dwell on something. I will be looking for a used one. I see a good one on Ebay right now but the auction end date is at a time which finds me without funds.


Don’t overlook the Behmore roaster
It’s very affordable and by all reports a great performing roaster

http://behmor.com...1600-plus/

KK
My web site > koffeekosmo.com.au I home roast and I like it :P
Blog - http://koffeekosm...gspot.com/
Bezzera Strega: BNZ MD74 Grinder: 5 Box hand grinders: Pullman Tamper Convex: (KKTO) Turbo Oven Home Roaster: CONA Glass Rod Syphon: Pyrex Brewer:
 
koffeekosmo.com.au
Ozo


Don’t overlook the Behmore roaster
It’s very affordable and by all reports a great performing roaster
http://behmor.com...1600-plus/

KK


I have been viewing the Hot Top videos and it looks far more complex than I would like not to mention the price..

Thanks for mentioning the Behmor as it is closer to what I can spend and is less complex I assume. I will definitely be looking at it closely.
EDIT: I just watched this short video with Joe Behm making the Behmor 1600+ look quite easy to operate. He talks pretty fast but I will watch it a lot if I get the machine. He goes through the whole process in 2 minutes using fast forward to skip to first crack etc.
https://www.youtu...899VD-5eUA
Edited by Ozo on 08-13-2018 14:05
Tim


"Espresso is a miracle of chemistry in a cup."
Andrea Illy
 
Ozo
Here is a bargain with a dent and a display issue but works, just $190. I see they are $395 after tax/shipping (Prime) at Amazon.


https://www.ebay....ehmor.TRS0
Edited by Ozo on 08-13-2018 14:18
Tim


"Espresso is a miracle of chemistry in a cup."
Andrea Illy
 
Ozo
Just finished first roast with the Victorio. Used a heat probe for the first time roasting and learned that I was roasting much too hot. Turned heat down at first crack but still too high , there was 15 second interval between cracks but turned heat off immediately at start of second crack and dumped them into the bucket cooler immediately not using the colanders as I used to. The bucket cooler had them at ambient in about three minutes but things were happening so fast that I am not sure exactly how long it took. Here are some times and temperatures from notes I took.

I was pleased with how much easier this roast was with the drill setup and the bucket cooler (No pre-cooling with collanders)

Using a corded drill had an unexpected bonus. To stop the drill I simple unplugged it, no fussing with the trigger.

It was nice to roast with the lid open. It is held open with a magnet. That also made it easy to place the probe directly in the beans.

2.5 minutes got some smoke
5.5 minutes turned down heat, temp @ 500 degrees F.
6.5 minutes 1st crack starts
8 minutes end of 1st crack
8.25 minutes 2d crack starts turned heat off
Dumped beans to bucket cooler late in 2d crack still at nearly 500 degrees F.
12 minutes was surprised to find beans were already at ambient

Ready to go
i.imgur.com/Z6DKf5y.jpg

Roaster is running very smoothly
i.imgur.com/ZZJspTK.jpg

Flame is on full
i.imgur.com/dOO9slN.jpg

Beans near ambient which was 99. Roasted a little more than usual which filled the colander of the cooler
i.imgur.com/iRTjIsZ.jpg

a little chaff in the cooler basket.
i.imgur.com/KfIt71f.jpg

chaff in the roaster
i.imgur.com/CaMtzMp.jpg

Full City+ 255 grams
i.imgur.com/IcnbZk7.jpg
Edited by Ozo on 08-15-2018 09:33
Tim


"Espresso is a miracle of chemistry in a cup."
Andrea Illy
 
Koffee Kosmo
Those roast times are a little to fast for my liking
Can you stretch them out another 3 minutes

KK
My web site > koffeekosmo.com.au I home roast and I like it :P
Blog - http://koffeekosm...gspot.com/
Bezzera Strega: BNZ MD74 Grinder: 5 Box hand grinders: Pullman Tamper Convex: (KKTO) Turbo Oven Home Roaster: CONA Glass Rod Syphon: Pyrex Brewer:
 
koffeekosmo.com.au
ChicagoJohn
Koffee Kosmo wrote:

Those roast times are a little to fast for my liking
Can you stretch them out another 3 minutes

KK


Good that you have a thermocouple now and that your new vessel is working well. My roast times for my wife's espresso are also longer as KK is suggesting to you. I'm using an air roaster, but in terms of time-temperature, I hit start of 1C at about 380-390°F at 9 minutes and proceed up at decreasing rate if ruse to the start of 2nd cracks at 430°F at 13 minutes when I turn on cooling. My final product does not develop any surface oil droplets over time in storage. Of course the only important criterion is what you like in the cup.
So many beans; so little time....
 
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