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NewBean
06/12/2019 3:57 PM
Just waiting on my TC4 shipment then it's roasting time

snwcmpr
06/03/2019 11:37 AM
I rarely purchase roasted coffee. I just ordered 4 bags from Mountain Air Roaster.

tm97
05/30/2019 12:34 PM
Hi, I use a wok with a glass lid for roasting. shaking the wok is a good exercise, actually.

NetriX
05/29/2019 9:08 PM
morning

snwcmpr
05/27/2019 1:56 AM
Kenya Nyeri Katogoto

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What Comes After A Poppery II?
Ken_K
Hello All,

I've been home roasting for about a year. Not knowing where this new hobby was going to lead, I started small and cheap with a WestBend Poppery II off Ebay. I immediately felt that the coffee was better than anything I could buy in the supermarket but had a couple of concerns. I was having trouble with consistency from batch to batch and was never sure I was able to get the full potential from a batch of beans.
I tend to roast small batches twice a week. My roaster heats up fairly fast and after the first batch I will get to first crack in 4 +- minutes. I am also having problems with the roast going from under roasted to over roasted in a split second.

I don't have the greatest taste buds in the world but can really taste when beans start to get old. I prefer beans from Kenya and recently had some from Costa Rica that I really liked. I tend to roast to City + to full City. I am also very sensitive to the burnt taste associated the the longer roasts (I"m talking to you Starbucks !).
With those issues in mind, I'm considering buying another roaster. I roast in my basement and smoke isn't much of an issue so far. I'd like my next roaster to be one that I won't outgrown for a while (if ever) but don't want to pay for a lot of bells and whistles that I'd never use. Cost isn't a major driver.

With those criteria in mind, I'd love to hear what everyone might suggest. Thanks in advance for your input.
 
oldgearhead
Smoke will be a problem as your batches get bigger. Smoke was not an issue when I had the 150 gram roasters, but I must use my 500 gram one in a well ventilated space.
Good luck!

No oil on my beans...
 
turtle
he...he...he.... You know you want it :)

legacy.sweetmarias.com/mrespresso-indiacupping/wood-fired.coffee.roaster.JPG
Mick - "Drinking in life one cup at a time"
"I'd rather be roasting coffee"

Roaster 1: San Franciscan SF-1
Roaster 2: Hottop B-2K+
Roaster 3: Behmor 1600 +
Grinders: Modified Super Jolly - Forte BG (x3)
Pour over: Hario - Bee House - Chemex - Kalita - Bodum
Drip: Bunn CWTF15-1 & CW15-TC (commercials)
Espresso: Pasquini Livia 90 auto
Vacuum: Cona - Bodum
Press: Frieling - Bodum Colombia
 
allenb
Welcome to HRO!

Lots of roasters to choose from! My personal favorite is a small gas fired drum roaster. Very simple to use, consistent and fun to operate. Unfortunately, most of the "more affordable" small gas drums are very difficult to procure and takes a very patient, persistent person to "adopt" the new family member from overseas. I would think seriously about the North TJ-068 500 that Mill City sells.

https://millcityr...e-roaster/

You'll want to make sure that which ever roaster you buy, that there is ample customer service support to help you with getting your hands around the roaster. From all I've heard, Mill City will give you that support.

Allen
Edited by allenb on 02/28/2017 2:29 AM
1/2 lb and 1 lb drum, Siemens Sirocco fluidbed, presspot, chemex, cajun biggin brewer from the backwoods of Louisiana
 
snwcmpr
As said, there are many to choose from.
After the initial Popper roaster phase, I made a modified popper. That was very helpful in learning some of the phases of the roast and what influenced them.
I got a Hot Top after that, and then went back to fluidbed, as in air roasting. I really like the home made roaster I have, made by AllenB.

Ken in NC
--------------
Backwoods Roaster
"I wish I could taste as well as I wish I could roast."

As Abraham Lincoln said "Do not trust everything you read on the internet".
 
renatoa
As simple and almost immediate usage as the popper is the turbo oven.
Please be aware that in the case of a TO the issue to solve is exactly the reverse of a popper! For a TO you have control and timer embedded in the heating unit, those are lacking for a popper, but you have to solve agitation of beans, which was a feature by design for a popper.
Chaff and smoke are a minor issue for this method, until you open the lid... advisable to do under a vented hood.

Another simple method is the bread machine and hot air gun, but the chaff and smoke are difficult to capture for this method.
DIY: TO based IR to bean 750g
Moded commercial: Dieckmann RoestMeister, Nesco, popcorn.
TC4ESP, PID controllers, MS6514 USB/Artisan/Apps
Grinder: MBK Feldgrind, mod'ed Porlex to 47 conical burrs, vintage PeDe Dienes
 
Ken_K
Thanks to everyone who replied. I was hoping to get some sort of consensus but no such luck. Allen, the Mill City roasters look fantastic but are out of my budget. There was a brief mention of Hot Top. That's about the limit for my budget. Any thoughts pro or con on those?
 
Scooter Dog
I would second the stir crazy/turbo oven or the bread machine/heat gun.

I went from a cheap popper to SC/TO and did that for about a year. Then I moved on to the BM/HG. I thought the BM/HG gave a little more even roast and could do a full pound a lot quicker. I had one of the cheaper turbo ovens with the halogen bulb and it took about 18 minutes to roast 1 lb to a city roast. I'm sure there are some tricks like removing the thermostat and such, that can improve temps and time, but I didn't go there.

I am now mostly roasting on a 10 lb BBQ roaster, but will still go back to the bread machine if I need smaller batches.

Daniel
 
turtle
Ken_K wrote:

Thanks to everyone who replied. I was hoping to get some sort of consensus but no such luck. Allen, the Mill City roasters look fantastic but are out of my budget. There was a brief mention of Hot Top. That's about the limit for my budget. Any thoughts pro or con on those?


I looked and looked when I thought about roasting coffee.

In the end I chose as my 1st coffee roaster a "needs help" model B Hottop.

I immediately set out on a plan of modifications (BT/ET probes, safety over rides, etc).

I used this modified Hottop roaster for a number of years until the control panel went stone cold on me. I was able to keep it alive by cleaning and babying it but in the end it was toast.

I then purchased a plus model upgrade from Hottop and have never looked back.

Half a decade with Hottop and I can say that if you are contemplating one, you are on the right track.

You can search out my older modification topics if you want to know the "details"

.
Mick - "Drinking in life one cup at a time"
"I'd rather be roasting coffee"

Roaster 1: San Franciscan SF-1
Roaster 2: Hottop B-2K+
Roaster 3: Behmor 1600 +
Grinders: Modified Super Jolly - Forte BG (x3)
Pour over: Hario - Bee House - Chemex - Kalita - Bodum
Drip: Bunn CWTF15-1 & CW15-TC (commercials)
Espresso: Pasquini Livia 90 auto
Vacuum: Cona - Bodum
Press: Frieling - Bodum Colombia
 
Randy
Ken_K wrote:

Thanks to everyone who replied. I was hoping to get some sort of consensus but no such luck. Allen, the Mill City roasters look fantastic but are out of my budget. There was a brief mention of Hot Top. That's about the limit for my budget. Any thoughts pro or con on those?

As a newbie who went from a whirley pop to a Hottop B-2K+ my vote is for the hottop. This is a roaster you wont outgrow anytime soon. I have not even started using the computer with it, I'm still on auto and ejecting when I like the color and have been thrilled with the results. No chaff to speak of, easy to clean and the consistency of the beans...amazing. I feel it's worth the extra money to get the "plus" even if you don't use it for awhile as it will grow with you.
As far as the price, I figured I spend over a grand a year in prepared coffee before I started roasting my own, so I feel it's worth it. Its also a very appreciated gift when you give someone fresh roasted coffee. You can occasionally find used machines and there is a link somewhere here of someone selling a hottop + for $1000.00 assuming it's not sold by now.
IMHO, those that have roasted their own are not going back to stale, store bought beans anytime soon. That being said, it only makes sense to get the best machine your budget can handle. I felt the hottop's price was too steep at first for just roasting my own coffee, but I now feel I made a good investment on something that I drink everyday and had in the past spent a premium price when others were doing the roasting a preparing.
I feel I got good value for the money spent.
Hope this helps
If at first you don't succeed...destroy all evidence that you tried - Steven Wright
 
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