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allenb
OfflineAdmin
· 04/02/2020 4:50 AM
Morning Ed, I haven't done any green coffee hoarding yet but am hoping the supplies don't end up like the toilet paper isles!

snwcmpr
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· 03/31/2020 2:53 PM
Hey Ed. Thanks. roar

homeroaster
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· 03/31/2020 11:21 AM
Hey quarantined home roasters! I hope you have great coffee! If they have a run on coffee, I hope you're set with your great home roast! Find me on Facebook! Ed Needham

snwcmpr
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· 03/25/2020 11:49 AM
New Rochelle in the news. I think of you every time I hear it. ... Please stay safe.

allenb
OfflineAdmin
· 03/21/2020 7:36 AM
Good morning homeroasters morning Everyone is hopefully staying healthy through this. Hang in there and stay safe!

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Best possible blend options?
turtle

Quote

you need a lot of extra coffee to do this with and my guess is many only have a small amount to blend.

ginny



There is a very simple solution to that dilemma :)

i1066.photobucket.com/albums/u414/turtle-web/food/coffee/beans/bean_stash_8-24-2014_zps05298d9d.jpg
Edited by ginny on 09/06/2016 6:10 AM
Mick - "Drinking in life one cup at a time"
"I'd rather be roasting coffee"

Roaster 1: San Franciscan SF-1
Roaster 2: Hottop B-2K+
Roaster 3: Behmor 1600 +
Grinders: Modified Super Jolly - Forte BG (x3)
Pour over: Hario - Bee House - Chemex - Kalita - Bodum
Drip: Bunn CWTF15-1 & CW15-TC (commercials)
Espresso: Pasquini Livia 90 auto
Vacuum: Cona - Bodum
Press: Frieling - Bodum Colombia
 
ChicagoJohn
Let me know when you'll be ready to accept orders. party
So many beans; so little time....
 
turtle

Quote

ChicagoJohn wrote:

Let me know when you'll be ready to accept orders. party


I have never even given away coffee outside of my close family

AND,,,

As a gift to one person through a contest on another web forum

Outside of that one gift and family I have personally consumed all I have roasted over the years.

.
Mick - "Drinking in life one cup at a time"
"I'd rather be roasting coffee"

Roaster 1: San Franciscan SF-1
Roaster 2: Hottop B-2K+
Roaster 3: Behmor 1600 +
Grinders: Modified Super Jolly - Forte BG (x3)
Pour over: Hario - Bee House - Chemex - Kalita - Bodum
Drip: Bunn CWTF15-1 & CW15-TC (commercials)
Espresso: Pasquini Livia 90 auto
Vacuum: Cona - Bodum
Press: Frieling - Bodum Colombia
 
ChicagoJohn

Quote


Outside of that one gift and family I have personally consumed all I have roasted over the years.

.


Well, you have quite the inventory, I must say !
So many beans; so little time....
 
bigtexun
My thoughts on blending has a lot to do with how flavors work in general.

When I taste a cup of coffee with a clean pallet, I don't have a lot of "flavor context" so I can taste things with more sensitivity, but coffee hits so many notes it can limit your ability to taste them all. So if you taste two different coffees with a clean pallet, you can pick up some of the differences, but not all of them.

On the other hand, if you drink a cup of coffee first, so you have a context, you can then take a sip of something new, and you will find that you can taste with better clarity the usually subtle differences between the two coffees. How you use this information depends on what you are trying to do, but this is how I try to understand any single ingredient quality when I'm cooking (for example).

One thing I learned from cooking is that following a recipe is fine for a food factory, or an inexpensive restaurant... But if you want to develop the best version of a dish (or your personal interpretation of the dish) it is often a great starting point to look at not one, but 5 or 6 different recipes for the same thing, then set out on your own to develop your own recipe. In doing that I often take the same basic ingredient from different sources and figure out what makes one better than the other, and then decide how that affects the best ratio of that ingredient in the context of the others.

My wife frequently comes home and tells me "I volunteered you to make the xyz for the office party next month"... It is often something I have never cooked before, so I spend the month making the dish over and over, learning how it's flavor components work, and developing both the recipe and method... Then when it's time for the real thing, I'm knowledgeable about what makes the dish great and I'm ready to make the best one I can make.

I see coffee blending as the same thing. The only difference is that the ingredients to a blend are still all coffee. So it is naturally a more subtle thing than cooking in that regard. This is why developing a method of finding the differences in what are actually very similar things is important.

For coffee, my prep for developing a blend would be first to understand the flavor notes of each of your available ingredients, and find the notes you want to marry in your blend. Where this deviates from following someone else's recipe is that it gives you the chance to evaluate different versions of coffees of similar origin... and those differences can lead to different ratios for that particular ingredient.

Whether it is coffee or pecans, or chilis, bringing different varieties together and comparing them together is the best way to develop a sense of which ones you want to use, and how you might want to blend them to compliment each other.

But clearly I don't use recipes the same way other people do.

But the question I'm focused on here is "Best possible blend options". To me the question suggests that a static recipe couldn't be the answer, mainly because the word "best" was used. A recipe made without testing your versions of the beans with your version of roast can never be best, it is simply good. Best is what comes after you have good, and you refine it.

Does any of that make any sense?

I'm an engineer. I work in a world where you figure something out, then do it the exact same way every time after that, and you always get the same results. Flavor doesn't really work that way, mainly because of each instance of an ingredient is different and unique, and each cook produces different results.

I guess my point is to develop a method of tasting and blending as your own. It is one thing to taste something that is good, and something else entirely to taste something and know why it is good. To be a blender, you need to develop your grasp on "why". And it is more than just the beans, roasting profiles are an equal contributor to the math. It is likely the "best" will involve more than one roast profile. Perhaps more than one profile for a simple variety of bean... It is possible to make a blend from a single bean variety roasted in different ways. I do that in cooking /all the time/.
 
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