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JackH
OfflineAdmin
· 07/04/2020 10:27 AM
Happy 4th of July! jazzyhands

JackH
OfflineAdmin
· 06/24/2020 7:58 AM
@Mark McCornack, Please post your question in the forum.

Mark McCornack
Offline
· 06/15/2020 9:28 PM
Hi! Looking for a legacy inlet temp sensor on 13 yr old Gene Cafe. It seems they've changed it and now you need new mother board and new sensor. Any ideas where I can find compatibile old one? Mark

Samaniego
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· 06/09/2020 6:39 PM
Wich thermometers Can i buy for my roasting machine compatible with usb or macbook?

JackH
OfflineAdmin
· 06/05/2020 5:38 PM
peveleth, It is better if you start a post in the forum with your question. These shouts go away in time.

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super excited about my new HT
jinx
I just got off the phone with the seller of my (new to me) Hottop. Its going to take a while to get to me through ups shipping, but I am already excited to acquire it.
I'll have to give it a full cleaning, and get consumables for it, like filters and cleaners.
Eventually, I feel my goal is to use a laptop to drive the profiles, but at first, I am going to see how it goes with careful logging and manual controls. I have a few leftover thermocouples and meters that will be applied to the roasting.

My roasting will be in the doorway of my garage, probably on a wheeled cart. I'll have to check the voltage on my thick extension cords.

As the beans are just for my home use, I feel that the volume of 250 grams will cover it. Even if I end up roasting twice, that's fine too.

When I bring in the beans for office use, that's when everyone will become my best friend. I'll then be able to compare the home espresso to the office french press methods.

Comments for newbie hottop roasters welcomed, I was using a turbo stir crazy prior to this.
 
az erik
That was quick!

Be aware the HT doesn't drop temps for the drying phase, in all reality i havn't found it needed. I just ramp the fan a bit.

Forget the back filter, use a brown 1/4 inch thick Scotchbrite pad cut to fit. The black felt thing that comes with the back filter is the same piece that goes int the top filter. Take out the 2 screws to the top filter, and pry out the metal grid from the bottom. Cut the old felt filter thing to fit fully in the top of the filter housing. You can get 2 or 3 from the back of one back filter.

Dustbuster will be needed for less chaff. I used this http://www.target.com/p/black-decker-...OgodGSUALA
It got into the chaff tray area well as well. Hit eject and put the nossle near the eject chute, using the dust buster as a off the side cyclone while the beans are coming out. Then you can pull chaff tray (it's hot 400F hot) and suck out chaff there, then suck out the chaff inside the tray area.

If you want to cool quickly again, pull the back filter mostly out, it flows about 20 more cfm that way. I usually keep the chaff try out while cooling. You can pull the bean tray once the beans are cool enough for you. Put the chaff tray mostly back in and start the next roast (leaving the back filter out) It'll suck air through the tray area out the back to cool the roaster quicker. With the filter in place you'll double your cooling time.

The "load bean alarm" will be a different temp the first roast, as opposed to all following roasts that night. The sensor reads different. The first roast will be 'cooler'.
Edited by JackH on 04/11/2014 2:57 PM
 
jinx
Back from vacation, I unboxed the new to me HT. It needs a clean out, not from chaff, but from styrofoam peanuts that got into the chamber. Also, there seems to be a light colored crust on most of the surfaces, nothing that a good wipe down wont cure.
I went to inspect the rear filter, and upon trying to unclip the housing grid, it snapped in several pieces. I guess why that is why the replacement filters come assembled. I am going to use the scotch bright pad approach.
I have to decide if I want to go outdoors with this, or inside. If inside the basement, then I need to construct a large cardboard box hood and fan vent it outside with a dryer duct.
Also, I am eyeing the tc4c as an option, but I do not currently own a pc that would run the software. My work laptop is in lockdown administrator mode, and Ipad wont pass as an interface, and all of my older PC's are laughably weak and ancient.
more to come when I have time to tackle all of the issues
 
Barrie

Quote

az erik wrote:

That was quick!

Be aware the HT doesn't drop temps for the drying phase, in all reality i havn't found it needed. I just ramp the fan a bit.

If you want to cool quickly again, pull the back filter mostly out, it flows about 20 more cfm that way. I usually keep the chaff try out while cooling. You can pull the bean tray once the beans are cool enough for you. Put the chaff tray mostly back in and start the next roast (leaving the back filter out) It'll suck air through the tray area out the back to cool the roaster quicker. With the filter in place you'll double your cooling time.

The "load bean alarm" will be a different temp the first roast, as opposed to all following roasts that night. The sensor reads different. The first roast will be 'cooler'.


With the B-2K the temperature can be adjusted to whatever level you wish, drying or any other phase?

There has been discussion as to what one is trying to cool during the cooling phase, other than the drum, and the motor assembly is mentioned as being important. Someone pointed out on another thread that pulling the chaff tray during cooling helps cool the drum, but allows air flow to by-pass the rear compartment and may not be advisable. I have no personal measurements to support this.
Barrie (San Diego, CA)
"So much to learn, so little time."
Hottop 2K+., Artisan, Jura Capresso ENA 3 (i.e. espresso).
 
snwcmpr
When I first got the HT I had, I would remove the front cover, chaff tray, and rear filter for faster cooling.
Then later, I acquired a small Eureka Boss vacuum and connected the hose to blow into the bean chute.
If I wanted to do a second roast, I got better results if the machine was cooled all the way. It took a lot longer, but, it worked for me.
Ken in NC
--------------
Backwoods Roaster
"I wish I could taste as well as I wish I could roast."

As Abraham Lincoln said "Do not trust everything you read on the internet".
 
ginny

Quote

Be aware the HT doesn't drop temps for the drying phase, in all reality i havn't found it needed. I just ramp the fan a bit.


the beans are dumped and the temp slowly reduces itself...

not clear on your comment.


-g
 
Barrie
My comment related to the initial +/- 5 min phase up to, say, 300F.
Barrie (San Diego, CA)
"So much to learn, so little time."
Hottop 2K+., Artisan, Jura Capresso ENA 3 (i.e. espresso).
 
ginny
Barrie:

it was not your comment I was asking about, it was az erik's...


-g
 
jinx
I too am confused with Eric's post about the drop temps in the drying phase. Especially as it was not part of my original post.
I feel the immediate next step is to bore two holes in the rear plate of the hottop to place bt and et probes.
 
boar_d_laze
It's been a few years since I used a HotTop but I don't know what az erik meant either by lowering drop temps.

One thing I found confusing was the use of the ambiguous but common term "drop," instead of the more precise term "charge." Don't mean to lecture, it's very common to use "drop" willy nilly. But it makes sense to reserve the term "charge" for beans in, and "drop" for beans out.

Roasting theory 101 has it that low charge temps are important to prevent scorching and tipping on certain kinds of beans. Notably low altitude soft beans, natural process, honey process, etc. Personally, I almost always charge low, and -- if necessary -- make up for it during Drying and Ramp.

No amount of airflow will compensate for a too-high charge temp; although airflow can help control temps even if the power is cranked. That is, the "temp" and the power setting are not the same things. Could it be that erik wasn't making the distinction in his post?

Rich
USRC 1lb Roaster, Chemex+Kone, Espro, Various FPs, Royal Siphon Vacuum, Yama Ice Drip Tower, Bunnzilla, La Cimbali M21 Casa, Ceado E92.
CookFoodGood
 
snwcmpr
Sometimes doing it the 'wrong way' will result in improved flavor. One needs to experiment.

forum.homeroasters.org/forum/viewthre...ad_id=3324

I charged at 375° as displayed on HT screen, and I never had a scorched look or taste. I got the drying time reduced, and had much better tasting coffee.

Ken in NC
--------------
Backwoods Roaster
"I wish I could taste as well as I wish I could roast."

As Abraham Lincoln said "Do not trust everything you read on the internet".
 
az erik
My comment was directed at the auto profile on the HT (sorry for the confusion) From what I was remembering the auto used only the fan coming on at a preset time. No physical heat reduction/hold during the drying phase.

I was never able to 'hold' a 300 degree drying phase. it crept or stalled mostly. (Holding ET to around 300 for the drying) I just couldn't get the HT to react fast enough after that to hit 1 c in less than 10 min.

I'd charge at 400/450 but couldn't stall the heat rise, so I gave up and just started ramping the fan more between a BT of 285-305. I'd still end up with moisture on the filter housing at the end of the roast though. Once I started doing this I was able to get a slightly brighter cup than before. I used to have flat roasts from the 100% all the time heater and Bean drop at the HT's "load beans beep".
 
jinx
And now its time for a quick update. Roaster is on my bench, with the high heat jb weld curing. They plug up the two holes for BT and ET probes. Dis-assembly was easy enough, all parts and bits labeled and put aside. I was amazed at the fuzz, chaff and tarnish to the insides of the machine. TSP is my new friend, I soaked some all metal parts overnight, that stuff works well.
No real problems, smells a bit bad though, I am curious about the PO's roasting process, as my used roasters don't smell that bad.
I think that tonight I'll be reassembling everything, and be ready for a weekend fireup to roasting. Its been a hard 6 months of buying stale junk coffee, how do they sell such crap to everyone, and the prices!
From what I have read online, I'll be going full manual for the profiles, paying attention to smells, sights, temps and time. An initial 250 gram load will point towards the time it takes, and the power in the line/machine.
I really prefer a discreet cooler, my shop vac and colander can cool a batch in 20 seconds. Has anyone setup a chute that by-passes the hottop's cooler?
In time, I will get the controller and software for this, first I'll try my hand at manually roasting, as I have lots of SCTO experience.
 
az erik
Don't bypass the cooler/agitator. Pull the fan from the bottom, it's tiny like 60mm. Pipe your shop vac to the underside of the HT with that fan removed, cooling will be amazing.

That grime etc is just from time and lack of full on soakings. The bean inlet gets all kinds of crap around it from smoke. that in turn drips down the sides into everything else. The fuzz will be back after 5 or 6 roasts. I thought my HT was molding at first, turns out "roastium" :)

Rinse the TSP really well as it's pretty nasty stuff. Simple green over night in a 5 gallon bucket does a great job too. Lot less scrubbing. It's a bunch of screws to take out but it's pretty simple to strip down to about this:
lh4.googleusercontent.com/-ZNeP4S8Covk/U2LXPAadZmI/AAAAAAAAKog/DT7aU2iECBM/s640/photo%25201.JPG
lh3.googleusercontent.com/-zm8i5r2bTUw/U2LXQ-i9dyI/AAAAAAAAKoo/yorTFSBKlT4/s640/photo%25202.JPG
 
jinx
That's the state mine is in. Motor bracket off but still wired up.
I'll have to try simple green next time, can't beat that smell.

Just waiting for the kids to doze off before I escape to the basement lab. Muhuhaahaa.
 
Barrie

Quote

jinx wrote:

That's the state mine is in. Motor bracket off but still wired up.
I'll have to try simple green next time, can't beat that smell.

Just waiting for the kids to doze off before I escape to the basement lab. Muhuhaahaa.

Oxyclean is excellent for soaking. Lots of options.
Barrie (San Diego, CA)
"So much to learn, so little time."
Hottop 2K+., Artisan, Jura Capresso ENA 3 (i.e. espresso).
 
snwcmpr
Full Circle (Urnex) makes a whole line of non-toxic coffee machine cleaners.
I use this .... ... http://www.amazon.com/Urnex-Full-Circ...B004L8TN3M ...
A small amount in hot water breaks down the toughest coffee tar.
And it doesn't leave a smell after I am done.

Ken in NC
--------------
Backwoods Roaster
"I wish I could taste as well as I wish I could roast."

As Abraham Lincoln said "Do not trust everything you read on the internet".
 
az erik

Quote

jinx wrote:

That's the state mine is in. Motor bracket off but still wired up.
I'll have to try simple green next time, can't beat that smell.

Just waiting for the kids to doze off before I escape to the basement lab. Muhuhaahaa.


I did pull the motor bracket just to gain a little more access to stuff but put it back on shortly after. Pull the drum pin and soak that too as it starts dripping oils. It's just a big cotter pin on the motor and it slips out.

Also those stainless steel sos pads take a lot of work out of the scrubbing after it's sat.

2 screws from the backside and the temp probe comes out for easier cleaning as well. Have to remove the motor (that's why I pulled mine) be aware there are 2 nuts that will fall (right down into the electronics below). I had to use the sos pad for the temp sensor. Then you can clean the back wall of the drum area easier. Oils/build up here screws with all of the warning/over heat protection in the HT software. Really a pain to clean with 2 screws sticking out on the inside of the drum area.

Oddly water is quite handy with an sos pad. I pulled my front window every 5 roasts and a quick soak/scrub (without removing the glass and chaff) towel dry and popped it back on in minutes. Same with the bean chute cover which cakes up just as fast or faster than the window.
 
jinx
I am four roast in on my hottop. Two roasts for me, and two for a friend (paying me). The process went as expected, I had to override a fan or heat setting, but i was able to steer the RoR to slow prior to 1c, and then stop at the initiation of 2c.
A few things I am pondering about with the Hottop. One, I find the top and rear vents interesting. Its my belief that, with a little trial testing, a stainless steel mesh screen could be doing the same job as the replaceable filters. Then it would only be a matter of soaking the stainless mesh in a solvent bath, and reuse, for life.
I have removed the filter material in the top, and I have folded over some loose screen I had on hand. I do not think that it is ruining the process, I could, however, see if the RoR could increase with a tighter mesh.
I am currently roasting outside, so smoke is not a concern. But, I am going to move this operation inside, especially if I am going to be switching to Tc4c at some point. A DIY exhaust hood, vented through a flexible tube, and out a window would be fine, even if I had to chase chaff through it every so often.

So far, the taste of the beans is outstanding. I need to raise the heat increase to get to 1c faster, but the ramp I am seeing from 1c to 2c is just about right. I am getting there with about 50% fan and 50% heat.
I can really see how the use of some software would end the fiddling with the buttons, and human error.
 
Barrie

Quote

jinx wrote:

I can really see how the use of some software would end the fiddling with the buttons, and human error.


Artisan website: https://code.google.com/p/artisan/

User guides: http://homeroasters.org/php/downloads...nloads.php
Edited by JackH on 06/24/2014 1:49 AM
Barrie (San Diego, CA)
"So much to learn, so little time."
Hottop 2K+., Artisan, Jura Capresso ENA 3 (i.e. espresso).
 
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