topbanner.gif
Login
Username

Password




Not a member yet?
Click here to register.

Forgotten your password?
Request a new one here.
Shoutbox
You must login to post a message.

snwcmpr
10/18/2019 2:37 PM
Eth Nat Yirg Idido roasted yesterday. I dropped some off at a friends coffee shop. In a few days he will brew it and tell me what he thinks. We already believe my roasts are better than what we have b

snwcmpr
10/16/2019 2:52 PM
Thank you for all you guys do.

JackH
10/15/2019 2:02 AM
They seem to be after the shoutbox. They have been removed. I don't see anything in the forums.

snwcmpr
10/14/2019 3:27 PM
We have been hacked. A whole lot of posts that have filled up the whole forum.

snwcmpr
10/10/2019 4:49 AM
Honduras Royal Reserve today.

Users Online
Guests Online: 2

Members Online: 0

Total Members: 6,193
Newest Member: wclark5179
In Memory Of Ginny
Donations

Latest Donations
renatoa - 2.00
allenb - 25.00
snwcmpr - 10.00
Groveland Hill Roas... - 25.00
renatoa - 2.00

View Thread

Who is here? 1 guest(s)
 Print Thread
Freezing beans
ginny
Let's face it, we all forget stuff. Perhaps some of you have ideas on freezing roasted beans.

I will be gone for a few days and want to leave my friends some beans that they will have when they get back so I need to roast right away. Shall I put the foil, heat sealed and valved bag on their kitchen sink or in their freezer for their return?

I so rarely freeze beans that I need some thoughts.

Thanks so much,

ginny always

s:8s:8 GrinGrin B)B)
 
EddieDove
Kitchen sink gets my vote.

The beans can rest in the foil bag and the CO2 will fend of the O2.

The thing about putting them in the freezer, is if people forget to bring them up to room temperature before opening the bag, condensation can accumulate. If ground with condensation it can cause some gumming up.

My thought FWIW ... ;)
Respectfully,

Eddie Dove

The South Coast Coffee Roaster
vita non est vivere sed valere vita est
Home Coffee Roasting Blog and Reference
http://southcoast...gspot.com/
 
http://southcoastcoffeeroaster.blogspot.com
David
I agree with eodove. There is another thing about condensation. If they only use part of the coffee, the water is still on the beans. Not so hot for freshness, IMHO, whether they put them back in the freezer or not.

If I am freezing beans for later use, I subdivide them into small "snack-size" baggies with about enough beans in each for my morning french press. Then I put all the baggies in a larger foil bag. Then when I open the freezer I can take out one or two of the baggies and no condensation gets on the other beans!

c:2B)
Edited by David on 01/06/2007 12:53 AM
 
Jeffo
I roast ahead and often freeze coffee. I put them in jars where the size allows the beans to fill the jar so there is little oxygen in the jar. When taking out of the freezer the jar and beans need to get back to room temp before brewing, but rest is usually needed anyway. The condensation is on the jar, not on the beans. I never take some beans out of a frozen jar and put some back in the freezer because there is where you may get some condensation. I use the whole jar and don't refreeze. Here is a very interesting thread:
Freezing Beans at cofffeed
Edited by Jeffo on 01/06/2007 5:00 AM
 
ginny
Hi Jeffo:

Thanks for your input. Do you have any thoughts on a heat sealed valve bag?

I have frozen several and the espresso has always been good. I will take a bag out I tossed in a couple of days ago as a test. Let it sit on the sink a few hours and pull a shot.

I am roasting today so I will put a couple of 1/2 pounders in the freezer; open one in a couple of days as soon as I take it out to see of there is any condensation on the beans.

They are very well heat sealed, I used a heat jaw, but the bags do have the valve.

ginny

s:8s:8GrinGrinB)
 
EddieDove
Jeffo,

Great link ... thank you! Grin
Respectfully,

Eddie Dove

The South Coast Coffee Roaster
vita non est vivere sed valere vita est
Home Coffee Roasting Blog and Reference
http://southcoast...gspot.com/
 
http://southcoastcoffeeroaster.blogspot.com
Jeffo
ginny wrote:
Thanks for your input. Do you have any thoughts on a heat sealed valve bag?
s:8s:8GrinGrinB)


Sorry, I don't have a heat sealer and don't use valved bags. I would like to have a vac sealer for mason jars but it's too expensive. I have occasionally frozen beans for my occasional customers (don't tell anybody). For that I use a tupperware container that is a good size for a pound, or double freezer bagged. I suck the air out of the bags so it almost looks like they were vac sealed.

I never specifically mentioned that I notice no loss in quality in freezing beans for my own use. But I have never done A/B comparisons. I do seem to have good "taste memory" though.
 
EddieDove
Jeffo,

If you have a store named "Tuesday Morning" anywhere near you, you can use the Black & Decker vacuum ($15.00) for containers with the FoodSaver mason Jar attachement. The store near me has a bunch of them. I don't think they sold very well because it only vacuum seals containers. It does not do bags or heat seal so it is also considerably smaller than a FoodSaver.

I also use its original hose end to vacuum the air out of the heat sealed valve bags before I ship them. Turns the bag into more of a brick.

Hope this is helpful to someone ... :)
Respectfully,

Eddie Dove

The South Coast Coffee Roaster
vita non est vivere sed valere vita est
Home Coffee Roasting Blog and Reference
http://southcoast...gspot.com/
 
http://southcoastcoffeeroaster.blogspot.com
Jeffo
eodove wrote:
Jeffo,

If you have a store named "Tuesday Morning" anywhere near you, you can use the Black & Decker vacuum ($15.00) for containers with the FoodSaver mason Jar attachement. The store near me has a bunch of them. I don't think they sold very well because it only vacuum seals containers. It does not do bags or heat seal so it is also considerably smaller than a FoodSaver.

I also use its original hose end to vacuum the air out of the heat sealed valve bags before I ship them. Turns the bag into more of a brick.

Hope this is helpful to someone ... :)


Does a regular vacuum work?
 
EddieDove
Will the vacuum work to seal mason jars? I never dragged it out to try since the FoodSaver is on the counter. May be way too powerful of a vacuum. Not that you use them, but it may damage the bags too.

I hope I'm not misunderstanding the question.
Edited by EddieDove on 01/07/2007 3:36 PM
Respectfully,

Eddie Dove

The South Coast Coffee Roaster
vita non est vivere sed valere vita est
Home Coffee Roasting Blog and Reference
http://southcoast...gspot.com/
 
http://southcoastcoffeeroaster.blogspot.com
Jeffo
I don't have a shop vac or know what the Black and Decker is like. What's the difference between shop vac, regular vac and the Black and Decker?

We have a small vacuum that came with the full sized Oreck (Oryuck). I wonder if that would work. Then it would be a matter of getting the mason jar lids.

Or maybe all this wouldn't make a difference for freezing.
 
EddieDove
Ah! I caused the confusion! I am not speaking of a vacuum cleaner or a shop vac. I was talking about the vacuum sealer that goes along with food storage canisters by Black & Decker.

I have not tried it, but it may be possible to use the mason jar sealer with the vacuum cleaner. As long as you don't pull too much of a vacuum and crumple the lid.

I just called my wife and she held the attachment up to the vacuum and said that it looks like it could be done.
Respectfully,

Eddie Dove

The South Coast Coffee Roaster
vita non est vivere sed valere vita est
Home Coffee Roasting Blog and Reference
http://southcoast...gspot.com/
 
http://southcoastcoffeeroaster.blogspot.com
ginny
OK, the test has been done on my roasted beans, in a heat sealed (I use a Hot Jaw) one way valved bag tossed into the freezer two days ago.

I took the beans out 1 hour ago and:

1. opened the bag and pulled out a handful and put them on the counter
2. there was no condensation on the handful
3. there was no condensation on the beans in the bag as I turned them and pulled them to the top of the bag
4. there is still no condensation on any of the beans

5. I ground some right away and found NO moisture
6. I have ground some each 20 minutes and found no issue with the grinds at all

So the test is now to grind and make a few shpots and a couple of cafe cremas.

More to come.

ginny


s:8s:8 since I need to lose a few lbs before I leave for Hawaii on thursday; I am going to get to pick beans on a small farm in Kona.

GrinGrinB)B)
Edited by ginny on 01/09/2007 1:42 AM
 
Jeffo
Spouting:
I keep my beans in the freezer up to 3 weeks. I only drink a cup and 1/3 of regular a day so a 1/4 lb roast lasts at least a week. And what I roast for my wife lasts at least 2 weeks. So instead of firing up the grill just to do one roast for myself I'll do a couple for myself and a couple for my wife (we usually share decaf).

I did have some Java Djampit in the freezer for three months for a customer who never ended up ordering it. I've used it in blends and it tastes fine but haven't had it by itself.

I want to roast some Monsooned Malabar and take little bits out of a jar as I need it, so your comments on not seeing condensation is nice to hear. It would probably take a lot to damage that funky bean though.
 
ginny
Jeffo:

I love the Monsooned Malabar. Great and you are correct funky bean. There are a few others I will check their names and post for you.

ginny

I am running another test tomorrow on frozen beans.

B)B)Grin
 
Jeffo
Ken Fox from this page:

http://www.home-barista.com/forums/viewtopic.php?t=1289&start=40

"Of course all of this is a matter of personal taste. The great majority of the time, the coffee I drink is between 3 days and 7 or 8 days old. It is rare for anything much older than a week to be in my grinder. I do a fair amount of freezing, however, of which I am a proponent if it is done right. Doing it right to me means that the freshly roasted coffee, straight out of my sample roaster, is in a sealed mason jar in a very cold freezer within an hour of the end of the roast. Beans frozen this way will continue to degas when you take the jar out of the freezer and let it reach room temperature again. I personally can't tell the difference other than that the beans don't absolutely stop maturing in the freezer, just the process is markedly reduced, so if you take out 1 month old beans from the freezer they may be the equivalent of a couple of days old in the aging process had they never been frozen. With previously frozen beans, they never stay frozen more than 3 months (usually, it is seldom more than 6 weeks), are kept at at least -10 degrees Fahrenheit, and are not repeatedly defrosted and refrozen. Generally I defrost the previously frozen beans and they are used up within 4 days of having been defrosted."
 
Jeffo
http://www.home-b...t3540.html
Excellent
Edited by Jeffo on 03/10/2007 11:54 AM
 
seedlings
If you enjoy technical jargon and legalese, there's interesting reading on the subject at:


http://www.sivetz...patent.htm


CHAD
 
ginny
CHAD:

Great link, thanks for taking time to post it!

ginny

s:8s:8
 
Jump to Forum:

Similar Threads

Thread Forum Replies Last Post
Grading green beans Green Coffee 4 10/04/2019 12:00 AM
Organic green beans Green Coffee 5 09/15/2019 6:07 AM
Burnt (Too many beans) Popcorn Popper roasting 3 08/28/2019 12:39 PM
storing roasted beans Storing Roasted Beans 52 08/06/2019 8:52 AM
Selling the roasted beans Roasting Coffee 4 03/31/2019 5:06 PM
Homeroasters Association Logo, and all Content, Images, and Icons © 2005-2016 Homeroasters Association - Logos are the property of their respective owners.
Powered by PHP-Fusion Copyright © 2019 PHP-Fusion Inc
Released as free software without warranties under GNU Affero GPL v3
Designed with by NetriX