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snwcmpr
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· 04/08/2020 7:42 AM
daniboy... You will best get an answer if you post in the forum. And the reply will be available afterwards, also.

daniboy503
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· 04/05/2020 10:37 PM
i need wiring modification for westbend poppery I that has AC fan with rotary dimmer and AC fan speed control switches Thank you!

allenb
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· 04/02/2020 4:50 AM
Morning Ed, I haven't done any green coffee hoarding yet but am hoping the supplies don't end up like the toilet paper isles!

snwcmpr
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· 03/31/2020 2:53 PM
Hey Ed. Thanks. roar

homeroaster
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· 03/31/2020 11:21 AM
Hey quarantined home roasters! I hope you have great coffee! If they have a run on coffee, I hope you're set with your great home roast! Find me on Facebook! Ed Needham

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Huehue in the Gene
Hieronymus Mouse
On 9/29, roasted in my GC 226 grams of a Huehue acquired from Victrola roasting company in Seattle last June. Here are the roasting params as far as I recorded them. (I cut this batch way earlier than previous to stop going into the more generic roast ranges.)

Preheated to point where drum registers 300 on intro of beans.
Kept at 375 for five minutes, then bumped to 475.
Cracks began at the eleven (11) minute mark, dropped 30 seconds later to 460.
Cracks ended around the 14.5 minute mark.
Cut to cool down at 14.8 minute mark.

Tasting this morning (10/3):
Lightly sweet "cookie" taste with ample viscosity, not cloying. Bitter-bright fruit in finish, not agressive. More complex in aftertaste, something like a mix of dry and fresh fruits with a fresh baked bread in the back and sides of tongue.

I think this lighter roasting is better for me than the heavier ones of previous tries. Any suggestions as to how to adjust the profile for the next wave of explorations? Thanks.

BTW, hope I placed this post in the right place. It's done in a GC, but more about roast profiling, I guess.

Michael
 
John Despres
Michael,

I think if the coffee tastes good, you're doing it right. The charging and warming temp may be a bit aggressive. Are you getting little divots in your coffee?

I warmed at 300F for 5:00 then bumped to 465-470F. Once 1st began, I dropped to 440, perhaps for Huehue.

A 3:30 of 1st crack seems quite long... You may be into second crack. First usually takes about 2:00. Are you getting smoke?

John
Respect the bean.
John Despres
Fresh Roast 8, Gene Cafe, JYTT 1k, Quest M3, Mazzer Mini, Technivorm, various size presses and many more brewers.
 
www.sceneitallproductions.com
Hieronymus Mouse
John, a million thanks for comments.

No divots. In fact, the beans under loope (sp?) show crenelations more typical of lighter roasts, and although the beans are expanded, the edges are not so rounded (puffed out). The creases of these beans are still tan-like, not quite as dark as the surrounding surface, a bit odd for high grown hard bean, right? This was the longest first crack in my limited experience ever and did strike me as odd.

I think you and/or others said that Guatemalan beans are high grown and that low grown beans have wider more pronounced creases. I treated the beans as hard beans, but your suggestions seem to indicate that the beans are softer. Is that right? What's the story there?

The beans come from Victrola in Seattle. The fellow who sold them to me at my request said they were about a year old at the time, toward the end of their usefulness at the company. I see no signs of color change in the grean beens. Don't know how significant all this is.

I think perhaps we're looking at idiosyncrasies in my GC. What do you think? I ordered a Huehue Xinabajul from SM. Will try something closer to your params with that. Your suggestions for the Huehue are close to your suggestions for the Geshe. I was wondering about that -- soft geshe in high Huehuetanango.

Again, thanks!

Best,
Michael
 
Hieronymus Mouse
Forgot to mention, no literal smoke, but a definitie less p,easing, sharper odor than the sweet light atoma of the roast at earlier stages. M
 
Hieronymus Mouse
A LOT more than I do, that's for sure. All I know is I'm amazed at the difference between what I'm getting lately and what I have available to me in the highest end coffee places in Brooklyn, NY. I like (love?) mine better. But what the hell do I know! haha. Michael
 
Hieronymus Mouse

Quote

John Despres wrote:

Michael,
I think if the coffee tastes good, you're doing it right. The charging and warming temp may be a bit aggressive. Are you getting little divots in your coffee?
I warmed at 300F for 5:00 then bumped to 465-470F. Once 1st began, I dropped to 440, perhaps for Huehue.
A 3:30 of 1st crack seems quite long... You may be into second crack. First usually takes about 2:00. Are you getting smoke?
John





Hi,

Well, I'm putting this here because it's done in a GC and the question regards roast, not cup, to wit:

Guatemala Vulcan de Fuego from SM, 132 grams, the last of it: 300/470/450. That is, much closer to your thoughts on the Huehue. And here's what happened. The beans entered and went through first crack, and that's it. Thinking to bring the roast up higher per SM's suggested level of FC/FC+, I left the roast going for three additional minutes. Guess what happened? Nothing. NO additional development. Look of the beans says the roast for the most part is sufficiently developed to taste OK or better. But I guess 455 or 460 might have been more appropriate. What are your thoughts on this weirdness?

Cordially,
Michael

PS: Also roasted the last of the Guat Gesha at 300/460/440 which behaved a lot more along expected lines. I have high hopes. M
 
erik82
I always preheat at 428F and after 5 min drop the beans. The first 2-3 minutes at 401F and the last 2-3 minutes 428F to get a total time of 5 min drying.

After that I ramp up more slowly then the conventional ramp of full blast after drying and it gives me much better results then with the standard 300/470/450-460F profile. And you get to the yellow stage in around 5 minutes instead of 7-8 which is much more like a professional drum roaster.

You just have to watch out the first couple of minutes and for soft beans use 3 min 401F and 2 min 428F. With hard beans you can do 2 min 401F and 3 min 428F. I tried the conventional profile a while back just for refference but this gave me lesser results in the cup.
Olympia Cremina 2013, HG one 83mm #0083, Gene Cafe.
Also Zassenhaus grinder, Chemex, Abid Clever Dripper, Kalita Wave, Aeropress, Hario Buono, Bodum Cafetiere and Bialetti Mokapot
 
John Despres
Hi, Michael.

Taste is a direct result of the roast, so talking of taste in that context is allowed since it's the final factor.

I think the Vulcan de Fuego batch may have been too small. I roast 226 grams every time so I may be a bit out of my area here. That said, each bean being slightly different, yes, a few degrees more may have been in order.

You note it was the last of your stock; how did the other batches turn out?

Are you keeping complete logs of each roast? Recording the temp at equal intervals? Say 30 or 60 seconds each?

John
Respect the bean.
John Despres
Fresh Roast 8, Gene Cafe, JYTT 1k, Quest M3, Mazzer Mini, Technivorm, various size presses and many more brewers.
 
www.sceneitallproductions.com
Hieronymus Mouse
Hey, Erik82, interesting idea. Michael, the owner of Brooklyn Roasting Company, recommended heading high right away with no preliminary drying of the beans. Your "drying time" is the highest I've ever read of. Today I'll try some new HueHue beans using something closer to your params and see what happens.

Interesting to note that a let-her-rip at 480 get-to-know-my-GC roaster roast, yellow was reached at the 5 minute mark. That's closer to you. And temp registerd 433. (No drum warmup; straight from ambient temp.)

Update: The beans I described earlier as doing nothing after first crack ended up delicious. So I guess something happened. Results in the cup is what matters.

John, you mentioned dropping to 440 after first crack with Huehue. That's far lower than what you had written for "hard beans" -- 460, I think. Is Huehue softer, then? BTW, I've got first crack down closer to two minutes.

Cordially,
Michael
 
John Despres
Hi, Michael,

Hmmmm...

No, HueHue is a hard bean. Since it didn't seem to work, go back to the higher number. Please do not take everything I post as Gospel. Our roasters will act differently and therefore you shall be responsible for your own experimentation. I can only offer guidelines.

My notes do show a lower drop does okay for harder beans, but maybe I have more power to my roaster? Dunno, but it sounds like you're growing your wings and will be tweaking to some very fine roasts pretty soon. You're asking all the right questions that are taking you to the next plateau.

Have fun!

John
Respect the bean.
John Despres
Fresh Roast 8, Gene Cafe, JYTT 1k, Quest M3, Mazzer Mini, Technivorm, various size presses and many more brewers.
 
www.sceneitallproductions.com
Hieronymus Mouse

Quote

John Despres wrote:

Hi, Michael.
snip...
Are you keeping complete logs of each roast? Recording the temp at equal intervals? Say 30 or 60 seconds each?
John



You know, I've been recording the major events at the times they occur rather than a running line entry at minute or half minute intervals. Evens include: Aroma (eg, first hints of "grass," sweet hay, turning to roasty, pure roast without sweetness, smoke), look (eg, first noticible color change, yellow, light brown, brown, chaff sluffing, notable difference between bean and crease color, homogenization of bean and crease color), cracks (eg, first sign, start of true roll, slowdown, last sounds). This to give an idea. I log these "events" on the left hand page. On the opposite, right hand page, I write dated tasting notes, and place "recommended" roast changes based on them at the bottom of the roast run notes page opposite on the left. In other words, comprehensive if chaotic notes.

I'll check my notes on the previous Volcan del Fuego roasts. Nowadays, I roast in 226 gram batches and find them easier to manage. I'm now buying green coffee in five pound lots which leaves room for experimentation.

Michael
 
erik82
BTW, I always roast batches of 250gr except for very chaffy beans.
Olympia Cremina 2013, HG one 83mm #0083, Gene Cafe.
Also Zassenhaus grinder, Chemex, Abid Clever Dripper, Kalita Wave, Aeropress, Hario Buono, Bodum Cafetiere and Bialetti Mokapot
 
Hieronymus Mouse
Yup, much easier. With 454 grams to the American pound, we Americans buying green coffee in pounds can manage our stocks better with roasts of 227 grams (1/2 lb). We'll go metric one day, but it means change, and change doesn't come easy to us.

Roasted a Guatemala Huehue Xinabajul and a Kenya Nyeri Gatomboya AB yesterday. I'll taste them before reporting further. They smell nice now though. I've got into the habit of holding off at least two-2 1/2 days before tasting so I don't jump to conclusions before the coffee has a chance to develop properly.

John, I know that Huehue coffees should be considered "high and hard," but nonetheless, I've been finding wide creases which either suggests a lower grown softer bean, or i've been screwing up. Hmm. And Sweet Maria's doesn't indicate much about the growing altitude of Kenyans. What do we know about them in this regard? Thanks.

Regards,
Michael
 
John Despres
Sweet Maria's grades the Huehuetenango as SHB - Stricly Hard Bean.

SHG = Strictly High Grown.

These are hard beans. The crease may be an anomaly but should not be taken as the final answer to determining bean density, but rather as a guide.

Have fun.
John
Respect the bean.
John Despres
Fresh Roast 8, Gene Cafe, JYTT 1k, Quest M3, Mazzer Mini, Technivorm, various size presses and many more brewers.
 
www.sceneitallproductions.com
Hieronymus Mouse

Quote

John Despres wrote:

Sweet Maria's grades the Huehuetenango as SHB - Stricly Hard Bean.
SHG = Strictly High Grown.
These are hard beans. The crease may be an anomaly but should not be taken as the final answer to determining bean density, but rather as a guide.
Have fun.
John


OK, thanks. Given that the crease might serve as a general guide, I'd like to compare the creases of green beans having only done so with roasted beans. I have Sumatra Lintong and Kenya Nyeri. Are either of these low enough grown to be illustrative, do you think? Michael
 
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