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snwcmpr
10/18/2019 2:37 PM
Eth Nat Yirg Idido roasted yesterday. I dropped some off at a friends coffee shop. In a few days he will brew it and tell me what he thinks. We believe my roasts are better than what we buy.

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Building a drum roaster
Ringo
I agree with Rob. If I was going to build a new roaster it would be mild steel around 2mm think. I would look for some scedule 40 pipe unless I could find a machine shop that would do one at a good price. Almost any machine shop will have a hooper out back with scrap, If you have a hydrolic repair shop around they throw out old tubes everyday, ask for old big air cylenders they have thinner walls. I live in Ohio, the iron belt, lots of heavy manufactoring so lots of good scrap, you just have to dig. My roaster started when I walked past a scrap pile and saw a piece of pipe on the ground, build around it. I do have some of the pipe I used left could sell you a foot for around $30, you pay shipping. I actually have some rusty 6" some rusty around 17" that is scrap but I think it all has a wall that too thick. I wish I would have went with 2mm. It would be cheeper for you to scearch local.

Thanks
Ringo
 
jerry43
Ringo, you mentioned when you started about maybe having your drum turned down. Instead of paying a machine shop, there ought to be plenty of home shop machinist in your area that would do it for some good coffee beans. Two good forums to post a request are Home Shop Machinist and Practical Machinist. It's amazing to see photos of what some people take apart to be able to get down in their basements. Most of those guys would love some kind of project to run their lathes for fun.
Edited by jerry43 on 04/01/2010 1:50 AM
 
Ringo
I have a lathe I can use at work, its old and I am very bad on it. We use it to drill shaft turn down bearings, If I do it I will mostlikly use the Mill machine. I know its not the right machine for the job but I am more comfortable using it. I will come in on a saturday and just start cutting then grind everything up with the grinder. I am going to try with this drum for a while first. I am hoping that if I drop at a low tempature, maybe 250 deg with the air on full burners off. Using all that steel for the first part of the drying then when BT and ET come together turn on the burners. Then for the remaining time till 350 deg adjust ET with the air. At 350 back off heat to slowly slid into 1c and lenthen time between 1c and2c. Little after 1C kill heat all together. I like to roast to City + mostly. My first roast I add way too much heat with all that steel that was a big mistake. My hope is to make all that steel mass work for me with less temp swings, time will tell ;)

Thanks
Ringo
Edited by Ringo on 04/01/2010 3:34 AM
 
jerry43
I want to see how you set up your ventilation system.
 
Ringo
Jerry look at the pictures on GCBC, Under "Coffey Related Discusions" "Help Building a drum roaster"
http://www.greenc...pic=8455.0
Just took an old 14 in pipe, with the fan on top pulling the air through the 3 " conduit with the butterfly valve in it. This condit enters the big pipe so the spinning drops out the chaff and the exhaust goes out the center. Do a Google for sawdust cyclone it will explane it better than me. This valve will be opened and closed by hand. Copied from an old Probate.
Edited by seedlings on 04/01/2010 7:41 AM
 
jerry43
Doesn't look like you need much help as you seem to have everything moving along well. Since you are over there in the GCBC, you must have bigger plans for that roaster than keeping you and your wife in roasted beans.

I've already had to hide some of my green bean stash from my wife. She thinks I've got too much. But she's a tea drinker so what can I say................
 
Ringo
I roast for familly and friends, sell nothing. I have a day job that I love and keeps me busy, so eveything else is for pleasure. I may sell a little to people at work, I will have too much capacity, but with the beamor it was starting to feel like work. I roast 5 to 8 pounds a week. Thats not much but one evening every week. And yes my stash is too Big, We are coming into bean high bean season, all the centrals coming out. I will be not buy:@ But I guess I have two boxes on the way now, So I will not buy starting next week.;)
 
jerry43
Ringo, have you got your roaster painted up yet? I'm sure everyone here would love to see the finished version.
 
Ringo
Progress has been slow, I am working on the bean cooler now, its almost done and coming out nice, bean stirrer built and working. I will post more pictures when I get done. I think I will have to throw out some of the old pictures I must have reached my limit becouse I can not post more. It is a little harder to find time to work on things now that Ohio winter is over, lots of outside work needs done, "Honey Do"
 
kelly7898
Ringo wrote:
Jerry look at the pictures on GCBC, Under "Coffey Related Discusions" "Help Building a drum roaster"
http://www.greenc...pic=8455.0
Just took an old 14 in pipe, with the fan on top pulling the air through the 3 " conduit with the butterfly valve in it. This condit enters the big pipe so the spinning drops out the chaff and the exhaust goes out the center. Do a Google for sawdust cyclone it will explane it better than me. This valve will be opened and closed by hand. Copied from an old Probate.


Such a very amazing link!
Thank you for the post.
_________________
Watch The Back-Up Plan Online Free
 
dja
Warrior372 wrote:
What are some good online sources for cast iron tube to utilize in making a roasting chamber? All I can find is solid rod.


Cast Iron Water Pipe would be the matrerial of choioce if I was going to make a drum roaster out of CI, and yes Cast Iron does have its little idios. that make it sorta hard to work with, its not hard to weld if you know how, it just likes to be warmed up before you weld it so it is all streched out like a long distance runner.

besides if you make the innerads where they can be bolted or riveted you don't need to do any welding anyway, which makes it easier for lots of people to build a roaster if they don't have the machines, skills, or knowledge that some builders do. I've seem some pretty good work on here from a B&D Drill and a Pop Rivet gun.

DJA
I pour Iron and roast Coffee BeansThumbsUp
If life seems normal your not going fast enough Mario Andrette
 
Ringo
Got a new link for you future builders, Its from coffeed.com. They are rebuilding an 85 probate L5. Nice rebuild and lots of pictures. http://www.flickr...tos/coava/
Edited by seedlings on 04/30/2010 3:06 AM
 
Ringo
After 5 months my roaster is finished. Thanks for all the help from everybody here.
Edited by Ringo on 05/23/2010 12:24 PM
 
dja
how did the sch 40 8" pipe work for a drum?, I have a peice that I am thinking about using for a drum if I can get the epoxy off of it.
I pour Iron and roast Coffee BeansThumbsUp
If life seems normal your not going fast enough Mario Andrette
 
dja
oh yea wheres the pics of the final product at????
I pour Iron and roast Coffee BeansThumbsUp
If life seems normal your not going fast enough Mario Andrette
 
ginny
40 PVC 8" will work a little better then you 1/2 or 3/4"; more beans will stick to the sides for you.

please send pictures!!

ginny

Shock
 
Ringo
I was having trouble posting pictures. Seedling got me working. This is the bottom of the bean cooler, works great. I took a 15" stock pot,screewed a moter to the bottom used a 1/2 shaft to stir the beans, I cut holes in the bottom for air flow, simple and cheap.
Ringo attached the following image:
2.jpg

Edited by Ringo on 05/24/2010 2:37 PM
 
Ringo
This is the air flow for the bean cooler. I know the next question will be, Why a big fan? The fan is from a scraped house furnace, any furnace company has tons of them you should be able to get them for $30 or less. just keep in mind this is the "Junk yard roaster"
Ringo attached the following image:
3.jpg
 
Ringo
Almost done here, just a little wiring left, behind is the chaf cyclone.
Ringo attached the following image:
4.jpg
 
Ringo
Just the power panel, two 20 year old honeywell plc's just used to read temps and give ramp set points.
Ringo attached the following image:
5.jpg

Edited by Ringo on 05/24/2010 2:48 PM
 
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