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JackH
OfflineAdmin
· 07/04/2020 10:27 AM
Happy 4th of July! jazzyhands

JackH
OfflineAdmin
· 06/24/2020 7:58 AM
@Mark McCornack, Please post your question in the forum.

Mark McCornack
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· 06/15/2020 9:28 PM
Hi! Looking for a legacy inlet temp sensor on 13 yr old Gene Cafe. It seems they've changed it and now you need new mother board and new sensor. Any ideas where I can find compatibile old one? Mark

Samaniego
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· 06/09/2020 6:39 PM
Wich thermometers Can i buy for my roasting machine compatible with usb or macbook?

JackH
OfflineAdmin
· 06/05/2020 5:38 PM
peveleth, It is better if you start a post in the forum with your question. These shouts go away in time.

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Building a drum roaster
Ringo
Vidget
I would be happy to help any way I can, but I have no drawings. I never make any drawings just find a piece of steel and look at it and say "lets try". This causes me lots of trouble when I build becouse I have to redo lots of stuff. If I try to draw too much I will get stuck in all the details and never do anything. I envy the enginers that can draw everything out before they build, my little shade tree brain does not work like that. So ask any question and I will make sure to help.
All you need in life is ignorance and confidence, and then success is sure. Mark Twain
 
John Despres

Quote

Ringo wrote:
I wanted to find out how large a roast I can do last night. I dropped 6 pounds in and it roasted great. I was able to get 6 pounds to 300 deg in 5 min, finished the roast with a city+ in 11:20 min.


I missed this one. Nice job, Ringo! What did you do with all six pounds?

John
Respect the bean.
John Despres
Fresh Roast 8, Gene Cafe, JYTT 1k, Quest M3, Mazzer Mini, Technivorm, various size presses and many more brewers.
 
www.sceneitallproductions.com
stoneguard
This whole thread is awesome. It is very cool to see the step by step in building your own drum. I hope to be there one day...
-Phil

Visit my [url=coffeestones.com]CoffeeStones Roast Profiler[/url]
 
Ringo
I can go through 6 pounds with my familly, everybody loves coffee. I did learn something for my next 5 pound roast, I can not do 5 pounds 1st roast of the day. The heat needs to build up first. Ok we are all friends here so I am going to confess why I roasted 6 pounds the first time. When I put coffee in the drop hopper I can not see it so I loaded two 3 pound batches by mistake, all through the roast had no clue, dropped the beans in the cooling hopper, seemed like a lot of beans? I started filling bag and I filled too many, scrached my head and said What??? So I did roast 6 pounds just did not know for a while.:|
Edited by Ringo on 10/14/2010 10:04 PM
All you need in life is ignorance and confidence, and then success is sure. Mark Twain
 
seedlings

Quote

Ringo wrote:
I can go through 6 pounds with my familly, everybody loves coffee. I did learn something for my next 5 pound roast, I can not do 5 pounds 1st roast of the day. The heat needs to build up first. Ok we are all friends here so I am going to confess why I roasted 6 pounds the first time. When I put coffee in the drop hopper I can not see it so I loaded two 3 pound batches by mistake, all through the roast had no clue, dropped the beans in the cooling hopper, seemed like a lot of beans? I started filling bag and I filled too many, scrached my head and said What??? So I did roast 6 pounds just did not know for a while.:|


GREAT story, Ringo! And to think... you probably never would have tried 6#. This is one of those glorious 'mistakes'.

Nice!ThumbsUp

CHAD
Roaster: CoffeeAir II 2# DIY air roaster
Grinder: Vintage Grindmaster 500
Brewers: Vintage Cory DCU DCL, Aeropress, Press, Osaka Titanium pourover
 
allenb
Most of my "breakthrough" improvements in roasting were found by screw ups. Most of the time I'm too worried about messing up a good bean to experiment much.

I think we need to designate someone to run a "test kitchen" for the forum who has a good fluid bed and drum roaster. We can all contribute high-end greens to the person for an endless supply of experimental roasting stash. All we'll require is a monthy report on "best profiles" for a given bean. For compensation they would have use of the roasts for all personal use. We would obviously have to put together a TV spot on the cooking channel to show off gear and roasting tips.

Alright, who's up for this position?
1/2 lb and 1 lb drum, Siemens Sirocco fluidbed, presspot, chemex, cajun biggin brewer from the backwoods of Louisiana
 
Vidget
Thank you Ringo for agreeing to advise:)
Your drum has a diameter of 8 inches and a length of 1 foot. What is the minimum he can roast with a stable quality of roasting and what the optimal batch for this size?

I design roster, from 1 to 3 pounds. It turns out I need a drum of smaller size than yours.
 
JETROASTER

Quote

allenb wrote:

I think we need to designate someone to run a "test kitchen" for the forum who has a good fluid bed and drum roaster.

Alright, who's up for this position?


.....Under the bus you go....

I nominate AllenGrin !!! -Scott
 
allenb

Quote

freshbeans wrote:

Quote

allenb wrote:

I think we need to designate someone to run a "test kitchen" for the forum who has a good fluid bed and drum roaster.

Alright, who's up for this position?


.....Under the bus you go....

I nominate AllenGrin !!! -Scott


I guess I had that coming.

Nah, I wouldn't be a good host. I'm not photogenic.
1/2 lb and 1 lb drum, Siemens Sirocco fluidbed, presspot, chemex, cajun biggin brewer from the backwoods of Louisiana
 
Ringo
Vidget
I can roast 1 pound reliably, that is the size roast I seem to do most often. I have roasted 1/2 pound but I really have to be carefull. I do a lot of 2.5 pound roast becouse its a even brakedown on the 5, 10 and 15 sizes we buy. One thing to think is the larger the dia of the drum makes the build easyer. With a small drum it would be hard to weld the stirring veins in the drum. The biggest problem is the front plate. There is a lot of stuff to fit in, The bearing uses a lot of the aria. If I did another build I would find a smaller bearing, most commercial drum just use a bearing in a sleave. You have to have a big hole for the Bean drop/ fume exhaust. A bean temp probe, environmental probe, view port for seeing the beans roast. A dump door. So as I was planning a roaster most of my planning would be on this frony plate. The three that really compete for the same spot are the bearing, the view hole and the bean temp probe. There is a sweet spot that is very important its at between 7 and 9 o'clock on the left side of the drum, the bean probe and the view port have to be there but the bearing uses up a lot of room. If you look at a picture of my drum my first view window was in my dump door, this was unusable. The beans just flew by the window too fast to see. I had to add a second window were the beans slow down as the roll off the stirring veins. This is also were the bean temp probe has to be becouse that is the biggest pile of beans. If I was going to build a new roaster I would use 1/8 inch steel on the drum if I wanted to do small roast. After a roast my drum is heated to around 430 deg, I drop my beans in for a small roast at 230 deg. I have a 10 min delay for cooldown. I use this time for packing the last roast, filling out the roast logs, getting the next roast ready but it a pain. I feel like all the steel help on large roast, for me on a propain roaster profile changes can be too fast so the steel helps smooth out the profile. If I was building a commercial roaster I would use less steel, that cooldown delay would kill you production. One more important part to plan is a big motor to turn the drum. Beans get stuck between the drum and the front plate the motor has to be able to overcome this. I would look for a min 1/4 horse that bolts directly to a gear box. The best would be a motor gearbox that slipped over the drum shaft. This would let you not have a bearing on the back of the drum. This motor gearbox will be very expensive. My gearbox was salvaged so the price was right but it only got the RPM down to around 145 rpm, so I had to do the final reduction with sprokets. Put a smaller sproket on the motor and a larger on on the drum and you can get your drum to 60 RPM. Sorry for the long run on explination just wanted help
with what I think are the important design points. I have said this before but I am not an engineer just a hacker so anything I say in just a guess not an educated guess.
All you need in life is ignorance and confidence, and then success is sure. Mark Twain
 
Vidget
Thank you Ringo for the very helpful advice and surround the text. Your information helped me a lot in understanding the construction of a roster.
How do you solve the problem of chaff and chaff collector?
 
Ringo
Build a cyclone for your roaster, send the exhaust into a drum at a tanget so the air will spin around the drum, this spining will sling the chaff to the outside and it will fall to the bottom. In the top add a pipe that goes down into the drum a foot or so at the center. Put your exhaust fan on this pipe. The exhaust fan will pull the chaff out of the roaster with the exhaust it will pull it to the cyclone, spin out the chaff and exhaust the gasses outside. Chaff is big and heavy so it spins out easy. Do a google image search for "Sawdust Cyclone" and "Coffee Roaster" and it should help you understand.
Edited by Ringo on 10/16/2010 7:50 PM
All you need in life is ignorance and confidence, and then success is sure. Mark Twain
 
Vidget
I know about the cyclone, I was interested to learn about the designs of chaff tray.
 
Ringo
I do not know how chaff trays work, I do not have one. All my chaff goes to the cyclone, I know some commercial roasters used them but have never seen one. I do not think you would need both. I would guess a screen that the exhaust filters through would work well.
All you need in life is ignorance and confidence, and then success is sure. Mark Twain
 
Vidget
The question has arisen. The roster needs to be heat insulation? and how to implement it in design?
 
Ringo
I used 1" fibeglass duct board, used to build heating ducts. You could see if you can find cut offs from the local heating contracter. You could get Kaowool off ebay.
All you need in life is ignorance and confidence, and then success is sure. Mark Twain
 
John Despres
Kao Wool is very easy to use. E-Bay or your local fireplace supplier will have it. It comes in variable thicknesses as well.

John
Respect the bean.
John Despres
Fresh Roast 8, Gene Cafe, JYTT 1k, Quest M3, Mazzer Mini, Technivorm, various size presses and many more brewers.
 
www.sceneitallproductions.com
Vidget
I have to use other materials, because I'm from Russia.
Next question:) Do I need a motor for circulating air in the drum and remove the chaff to be heat resistant? How did you decide this question? High temperature 200 degrees Celsius would be bad for the bearings and motor, in theory.
 
Ringo
I used a big cyclone with a leaky door, this dilutes the heat before it gets to the blower. I did not use a high temp blower but it could go out I guess. I wanted the cyclone to run cool so there is less of a chance of a chaff fire.
Edited by Ringo on 10/18/2010 5:02 PM
All you need in life is ignorance and confidence, and then success is sure. Mark Twain
 
Vidget
Can you share more photo of roaster and cyclone?
 
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